DNA repair in neurons: So if they don't divide what's to repair?

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159 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Neuronal DNA repair remains one of the most exciting areas for investigation, particularly as a means to compare the DNA repair response in mitotic (cancer) vs. post-mitotic (neuronal) cells. In addition, the role of DNA repair in neuronal cell survival and response to aging and environmental insults is of particular interest. DNA damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as generated by mitochondrial respiration includes altered bases, abasic sites, and single- and double-strand breaks which can be prevented by the DNA base excision repair (BER) pathway. Oxidative stress accumulates in the DNA of the human brain over time especially in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and is proposed to play a critical role in aging and in the pathogenesis of several neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease, ALS, and Alzheimer's diseases. Because DNA damage accumulates in the mtDNA more than nuclear DNA, there is increased interest in DNA repair pathways and the consequence of DNA damage in the mitochondria of neurons. The type of damage that is most likely to occur in neuronal cells is oxidative DNA damage which is primarily removed by the BER pathway. Following the notion that the bulk of neuronal DNA damage is acquired by oxidative DNA damage and ROS, the BER pathway is a likely area of focus for neuronal studies of DNA repair. BER variations in brain aging and pathology in various brain regions and tissues are presented. Therefore, the BER pathway is discussed in greater detail in this review than other repair pathways. Other repair pathways including direct reversal, nucleotide excision repair (NER), mismatch repair (MMR), homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining are also discussed. Finally, there is a growing interest in the role that DNA repair pathways play in the clinical arena as they relate to the neurotoxicity and neuropathy associated with cancer treatments. Among the numerous side effects of cancer treatments, major clinical effects include neurocognitive dysfunction and peripheral neuropathy. These symptoms occur frequently and have not been effectively studied at the cellular or molecular level. Studies of DNA repair may help our understanding of how those cells that are not dividing could succumb to neurotoxicity with the clinical manifestations discussed in the following article.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)24-36
Number of pages13
JournalMutation Research - Fundamental and Molecular Mechanisms of Mutagenesis
Volume614
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 3 2007

Fingerprint

DNA Repair
Neurons
DNA Damage
Mitochondrial DNA
Reactive Oxygen Species
DNA
Brain
DNA Mismatch Repair
Second Primary Neoplasms
Homologous Recombination
Peripheral Nervous System Diseases
Nervous System Diseases
Parkinson Disease
Neoplasms
Cell Survival
Alzheimer Disease
Mitochondria
Respiration
Oxidative Stress
Pathology

Keywords

  • Base excision repair
  • Direct reversal repair
  • Mitochondrial base excision repair
  • Neurons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

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title = "DNA repair in neurons: So if they don't divide what's to repair?",
abstract = "Neuronal DNA repair remains one of the most exciting areas for investigation, particularly as a means to compare the DNA repair response in mitotic (cancer) vs. post-mitotic (neuronal) cells. In addition, the role of DNA repair in neuronal cell survival and response to aging and environmental insults is of particular interest. DNA damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as generated by mitochondrial respiration includes altered bases, abasic sites, and single- and double-strand breaks which can be prevented by the DNA base excision repair (BER) pathway. Oxidative stress accumulates in the DNA of the human brain over time especially in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and is proposed to play a critical role in aging and in the pathogenesis of several neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease, ALS, and Alzheimer's diseases. Because DNA damage accumulates in the mtDNA more than nuclear DNA, there is increased interest in DNA repair pathways and the consequence of DNA damage in the mitochondria of neurons. The type of damage that is most likely to occur in neuronal cells is oxidative DNA damage which is primarily removed by the BER pathway. Following the notion that the bulk of neuronal DNA damage is acquired by oxidative DNA damage and ROS, the BER pathway is a likely area of focus for neuronal studies of DNA repair. BER variations in brain aging and pathology in various brain regions and tissues are presented. Therefore, the BER pathway is discussed in greater detail in this review than other repair pathways. Other repair pathways including direct reversal, nucleotide excision repair (NER), mismatch repair (MMR), homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining are also discussed. Finally, there is a growing interest in the role that DNA repair pathways play in the clinical arena as they relate to the neurotoxicity and neuropathy associated with cancer treatments. Among the numerous side effects of cancer treatments, major clinical effects include neurocognitive dysfunction and peripheral neuropathy. These symptoms occur frequently and have not been effectively studied at the cellular or molecular level. Studies of DNA repair may help our understanding of how those cells that are not dividing could succumb to neurotoxicity with the clinical manifestations discussed in the following article.",
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N2 - Neuronal DNA repair remains one of the most exciting areas for investigation, particularly as a means to compare the DNA repair response in mitotic (cancer) vs. post-mitotic (neuronal) cells. In addition, the role of DNA repair in neuronal cell survival and response to aging and environmental insults is of particular interest. DNA damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as generated by mitochondrial respiration includes altered bases, abasic sites, and single- and double-strand breaks which can be prevented by the DNA base excision repair (BER) pathway. Oxidative stress accumulates in the DNA of the human brain over time especially in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and is proposed to play a critical role in aging and in the pathogenesis of several neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease, ALS, and Alzheimer's diseases. Because DNA damage accumulates in the mtDNA more than nuclear DNA, there is increased interest in DNA repair pathways and the consequence of DNA damage in the mitochondria of neurons. The type of damage that is most likely to occur in neuronal cells is oxidative DNA damage which is primarily removed by the BER pathway. Following the notion that the bulk of neuronal DNA damage is acquired by oxidative DNA damage and ROS, the BER pathway is a likely area of focus for neuronal studies of DNA repair. BER variations in brain aging and pathology in various brain regions and tissues are presented. Therefore, the BER pathway is discussed in greater detail in this review than other repair pathways. Other repair pathways including direct reversal, nucleotide excision repair (NER), mismatch repair (MMR), homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining are also discussed. Finally, there is a growing interest in the role that DNA repair pathways play in the clinical arena as they relate to the neurotoxicity and neuropathy associated with cancer treatments. Among the numerous side effects of cancer treatments, major clinical effects include neurocognitive dysfunction and peripheral neuropathy. These symptoms occur frequently and have not been effectively studied at the cellular or molecular level. Studies of DNA repair may help our understanding of how those cells that are not dividing could succumb to neurotoxicity with the clinical manifestations discussed in the following article.

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