Do first- and second-year preclinical course scores predict student performance during the surgical clerkship?

F. A. Baciewicz, L. Arent, M. Weaver, R. Yeasting, N. Thomford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The study proposed to determine if a preclinical basic science index comprised of anatomy, behavioral medicine, biochemistry, microbiology, pathology, pharmacology, and physiology courses or any of these basic science courses would predict student performance during surgical clerkship. The basic science index demonstrated a correlation of 0.55 and 0.35 with the individual student's written and oral clerkship scores, respectively. A stepwise multiple regression using a backward stepping algorithm was applied; the dependent variables were oral and written clerkship scores, and the independent variables were the basic science courses. Microbiology, pathology, and physiology course scores were predictors of written score (R = 0.60). Pathology course scores were the sole predictor of oral score (R = 0.43). Medical student basic science performance was not a strong forecaster of performance on the surgical clerkship. The pathology basic science score was the only consistent predictor of performance on the written and oral evaluations given at the end of the clerkship.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)581-583
Number of pages3
JournalSurgery
Volume107
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes

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Students
Pathology
Microbiology
Behavioral Medicine
Medical Students
Biochemistry
Anatomy
Pharmacology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Baciewicz, F. A., Arent, L., Weaver, M., Yeasting, R., & Thomford, N. (1990). Do first- and second-year preclinical course scores predict student performance during the surgical clerkship? Surgery, 107(5), 581-583.

Do first- and second-year preclinical course scores predict student performance during the surgical clerkship? / Baciewicz, F. A.; Arent, L.; Weaver, M.; Yeasting, R.; Thomford, N.

In: Surgery, Vol. 107, No. 5, 1990, p. 581-583.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Baciewicz, FA, Arent, L, Weaver, M, Yeasting, R & Thomford, N 1990, 'Do first- and second-year preclinical course scores predict student performance during the surgical clerkship?', Surgery, vol. 107, no. 5, pp. 581-583.
Baciewicz FA, Arent L, Weaver M, Yeasting R, Thomford N. Do first- and second-year preclinical course scores predict student performance during the surgical clerkship? Surgery. 1990;107(5):581-583.
Baciewicz, F. A. ; Arent, L. ; Weaver, M. ; Yeasting, R. ; Thomford, N. / Do first- and second-year preclinical course scores predict student performance during the surgical clerkship?. In: Surgery. 1990 ; Vol. 107, No. 5. pp. 581-583.
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