Do HCAHPS doctor communication scores reflect the communication skills of the attending on record? A cautionary tale from a tertiary-care medical service

Vicente J. Velez, Roop Kaw, Bo Hu, Richard Frankel, Amy K. Windover, Dan Bokar, Julie M. Rish, Michael B. Rothberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) scores measure patient satisfaction with hospital care. It is not known if these reflect the communication skills of the attending physician on record. The Four Habits Coding Scheme (4HCS) is a validated instrument that measures bedside physician communication skills according to 4 habits, namely: investing in the beginning, eliciting the patient’s perspective, demonstrating empathy, and investing in the end. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the 4HCS correlates with provider HCAHPS scores. METHODS: Using a cross-sectional design, consenting hospitalist physicians (n = 28), were observed on inpatient rounds during 3 separate encounters. We compared hospitalists’ 4HCS scores with their doctor communication HCAHPS scores to assess the degree to which these correlated with inpatient physician communication skills. We performed sensitivity analysis excluding scores returned by patients cared for by more than 1 hospitalist. RESULTS: A total of 1003 HCAHPS survey responses were available. Pearson correlation between 4HCS and doctor communication scores was not significant, at 0.098 (-0.285, 0.455; P = 0.619). Also, no significant correlations were found between each habit and HCAHPS. When including only scores attributable to 1 hospitalist, Pearson correlation between the empathy habit and the HCAHPS respect score was 0.515 (0.176, 0.745; P = 0.005). Between empathy and overall doctor communication, it was 0.442 (0.082, 0.7; P = 0.019). CONCLUSION: Attending-of-record HCAHPS scores do not correlate with 4HCS. After excluding patients cared for by more than 1 hospitalist, demonstrating empathy did correlate with the doctor communication and respect HCAHPS scores.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)421-427
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Hospital Medicine
Volume12
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

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Tertiary Healthcare
Health Personnel
Hospitalists
Communication
Delivery of Health Care
Habits
Physicians
Inpatients
Hospital Records
Patient Satisfaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Leadership and Management
  • Fundamentals and skills
  • Health Policy
  • Care Planning
  • Assessment and Diagnosis

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Do HCAHPS doctor communication scores reflect the communication skills of the attending on record? A cautionary tale from a tertiary-care medical service. / Velez, Vicente J.; Kaw, Roop; Hu, Bo; Frankel, Richard; Windover, Amy K.; Bokar, Dan; Rish, Julie M.; Rothberg, Michael B.

In: Journal of Hospital Medicine, Vol. 12, No. 6, 01.06.2017, p. 421-427.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Velez, Vicente J. ; Kaw, Roop ; Hu, Bo ; Frankel, Richard ; Windover, Amy K. ; Bokar, Dan ; Rish, Julie M. ; Rothberg, Michael B. / Do HCAHPS doctor communication scores reflect the communication skills of the attending on record? A cautionary tale from a tertiary-care medical service. In: Journal of Hospital Medicine. 2017 ; Vol. 12, No. 6. pp. 421-427.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND: Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) scores measure patient satisfaction with hospital care. It is not known if these reflect the communication skills of the attending physician on record. The Four Habits Coding Scheme (4HCS) is a validated instrument that measures bedside physician communication skills according to 4 habits, namely: investing in the beginning, eliciting the patient’s perspective, demonstrating empathy, and investing in the end. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the 4HCS correlates with provider HCAHPS scores. METHODS: Using a cross-sectional design, consenting hospitalist physicians (n = 28), were observed on inpatient rounds during 3 separate encounters. We compared hospitalists’ 4HCS scores with their doctor communication HCAHPS scores to assess the degree to which these correlated with inpatient physician communication skills. We performed sensitivity analysis excluding scores returned by patients cared for by more than 1 hospitalist. RESULTS: A total of 1003 HCAHPS survey responses were available. Pearson correlation between 4HCS and doctor communication scores was not significant, at 0.098 (-0.285, 0.455; P = 0.619). Also, no significant correlations were found between each habit and HCAHPS. When including only scores attributable to 1 hospitalist, Pearson correlation between the empathy habit and the HCAHPS respect score was 0.515 (0.176, 0.745; P = 0.005). Between empathy and overall doctor communication, it was 0.442 (0.082, 0.7; P = 0.019). CONCLUSION: Attending-of-record HCAHPS scores do not correlate with 4HCS. After excluding patients cared for by more than 1 hospitalist, demonstrating empathy did correlate with the doctor communication and respect HCAHPS scores.",
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AU - Hu, Bo

AU - Frankel, Richard

AU - Windover, Amy K.

AU - Bokar, Dan

AU - Rish, Julie M.

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N2 - BACKGROUND: Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) scores measure patient satisfaction with hospital care. It is not known if these reflect the communication skills of the attending physician on record. The Four Habits Coding Scheme (4HCS) is a validated instrument that measures bedside physician communication skills according to 4 habits, namely: investing in the beginning, eliciting the patient’s perspective, demonstrating empathy, and investing in the end. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the 4HCS correlates with provider HCAHPS scores. METHODS: Using a cross-sectional design, consenting hospitalist physicians (n = 28), were observed on inpatient rounds during 3 separate encounters. We compared hospitalists’ 4HCS scores with their doctor communication HCAHPS scores to assess the degree to which these correlated with inpatient physician communication skills. We performed sensitivity analysis excluding scores returned by patients cared for by more than 1 hospitalist. RESULTS: A total of 1003 HCAHPS survey responses were available. Pearson correlation between 4HCS and doctor communication scores was not significant, at 0.098 (-0.285, 0.455; P = 0.619). Also, no significant correlations were found between each habit and HCAHPS. When including only scores attributable to 1 hospitalist, Pearson correlation between the empathy habit and the HCAHPS respect score was 0.515 (0.176, 0.745; P = 0.005). Between empathy and overall doctor communication, it was 0.442 (0.082, 0.7; P = 0.019). CONCLUSION: Attending-of-record HCAHPS scores do not correlate with 4HCS. After excluding patients cared for by more than 1 hospitalist, demonstrating empathy did correlate with the doctor communication and respect HCAHPS scores.

AB - BACKGROUND: Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) scores measure patient satisfaction with hospital care. It is not known if these reflect the communication skills of the attending physician on record. The Four Habits Coding Scheme (4HCS) is a validated instrument that measures bedside physician communication skills according to 4 habits, namely: investing in the beginning, eliciting the patient’s perspective, demonstrating empathy, and investing in the end. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the 4HCS correlates with provider HCAHPS scores. METHODS: Using a cross-sectional design, consenting hospitalist physicians (n = 28), were observed on inpatient rounds during 3 separate encounters. We compared hospitalists’ 4HCS scores with their doctor communication HCAHPS scores to assess the degree to which these correlated with inpatient physician communication skills. We performed sensitivity analysis excluding scores returned by patients cared for by more than 1 hospitalist. RESULTS: A total of 1003 HCAHPS survey responses were available. Pearson correlation between 4HCS and doctor communication scores was not significant, at 0.098 (-0.285, 0.455; P = 0.619). Also, no significant correlations were found between each habit and HCAHPS. When including only scores attributable to 1 hospitalist, Pearson correlation between the empathy habit and the HCAHPS respect score was 0.515 (0.176, 0.745; P = 0.005). Between empathy and overall doctor communication, it was 0.442 (0.082, 0.7; P = 0.019). CONCLUSION: Attending-of-record HCAHPS scores do not correlate with 4HCS. After excluding patients cared for by more than 1 hospitalist, demonstrating empathy did correlate with the doctor communication and respect HCAHPS scores.

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