Do-not-resuscitate discussions: a qualitative analysis.

W. Ventres, M. Nichter, R. Reed, Richard Frankel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The literature to date on Do-Not-Resuscitate (DNR) decision-making is based upon data derived from structured questionnaires, hypothetical scenarios, descriptive epidemiology, or simulated discussions. Lacking in the literature has been a critical examination of the health care professional-patient-family relationship and its impact on decision-making regarding resuscitation. The purpose of this study is to identify and describe organizational and communication factors that affect the process and outcome of DNR discussions and decision-making. Individual and focus-group interviews were conducted with sixteen key informants professionally knowledgeable about resuscitative issues. Thematic analysis of these interviews revealed that a variety of cultural and professional values, as well as previous personal experiences, influenced the assumptions that providers made when engaging in DNR decision-making. Specific recommendations are made to help family physicians identify communication strategies that foster understanding and lead to participatory decisions about resuscitation among patients and families.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)157-169
Number of pages13
JournalThe Family practice research journal
Volume12
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jun 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Decision Making
Professional-Family Relations
Professional-Patient Relations
Communication
Resuscitation Orders
Interviews
Family Physicians
Focus Groups
Resuscitation
Epidemiology
Delivery of Health Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Do-not-resuscitate discussions : a qualitative analysis. / Ventres, W.; Nichter, M.; Reed, R.; Frankel, Richard.

In: The Family practice research journal, Vol. 12, No. 2, 06.1992, p. 157-169.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ventres, W, Nichter, M, Reed, R & Frankel, R 1992, 'Do-not-resuscitate discussions: a qualitative analysis.', The Family practice research journal, vol. 12, no. 2, pp. 157-169.
Ventres, W. ; Nichter, M. ; Reed, R. ; Frankel, Richard. / Do-not-resuscitate discussions : a qualitative analysis. In: The Family practice research journal. 1992 ; Vol. 12, No. 2. pp. 157-169.
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