Do our current assessments assure competency in clinical breast evaluation skills?

Jeanine Chalabian, Gary Dunnington

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The focus of teaching for clinical breast evaluation has been the technique of breast examination. This study questions the relationship between breast examination technique and the ability to detect physical findings. METHODS: This study examines the relationship between breast examination skills of 66 graduating primary care physicians as measured during an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) and lump detection sensitivity and specificity on breast models. RESULTS: Overall breast examination performance revealed 50% of maneuvers performed correctly. Mean breast model sensitivity for lump detection was 40% and the mean breast model specificity was 77%. While a mild correlation existed between breast examination skills and lump detection sensitivity (r = .34, P = 0.01), no relationship was found between lump detection specificity and examination skills. CONCLUSIONS: There is a limited relationship between correct performance of breast examination maneuvers and the ability to detect a breast lump when present. Breast examination skills and palpation skills to detect masses may represent independently acquired skills with need for separate instructional methodology. These results raise serious concerns about the reliance on standardized patients alone for training in physical examination skills.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)497-502
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
Volume175
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1998
Externally publishedYes

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Clinical Competence
Breast
Palpation
Primary Care Physicians
Physical Examination
Teaching

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Do our current assessments assure competency in clinical breast evaluation skills? / Chalabian, Jeanine; Dunnington, Gary.

In: American Journal of Surgery, Vol. 175, No. 6, 06.1998, p. 497-502.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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