Do patient assessments of primary care differ by patient ethnicity?

D. A. Taira, D. G. Safran, T. B. Seto, W. H. Rogers, Thomas Inui, J. Montgomery, A. R. Tarlov

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

83 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. To determine if patient assessments (reports and ratings) of primary care differ by patient ethnicity. Data Sources/Study Design. A self-administered patient survey of 6,092 Massachusetts employees measured seven defining characteristics of primary care: (1) access (financial, organizational); (2) continuity (longitudinal, visit based); (3) comprehensiveness (knowledge of patient, preventive counseling); (4) integration; (5) clinical interaction (communication, thoroughness of physical examinations); (6) interpersonal treatment; and (7) trust. The study employed a cross-sectional observational design. Principal Findings. Asians had the lowest primary care performance assessments of any ethnic group after adjustment for socioeconomic and other factors. For example, compared to whites, Asians had lower scores for communication (69 vs. 79, p = .001) and comprehensive knowledge of patient (56 vs. 48, p = .002), African Americans and Latinos had less access to care, and African Americans had less longitudinal continuity than whites. Conclusions. We do not know what accounts for the observed differences in patient assessments of primary care. The fact that patient reports as well as the more subjective ratings of care differed by ethnicity suggests that quality differences might exist that need to be addressed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1059-1071
Number of pages13
JournalHealth Services Research
Volume36
Issue number6 I
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Primary Health Care
ethnicity
African Americans
continuity
rating
Communication
communication
performance assessment
Information Storage and Retrieval
counseling
Hispanic Americans
Ethnic Groups
ethnic group
Physical Examination
Counseling
employee
examination
interaction
American

Keywords

  • Asian ethnicity
  • Primary care
  • Quality of care
  • Race

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Health Policy

Cite this

Taira, D. A., Safran, D. G., Seto, T. B., Rogers, W. H., Inui, T., Montgomery, J., & Tarlov, A. R. (2001). Do patient assessments of primary care differ by patient ethnicity? Health Services Research, 36(6 I), 1059-1071.

Do patient assessments of primary care differ by patient ethnicity? / Taira, D. A.; Safran, D. G.; Seto, T. B.; Rogers, W. H.; Inui, Thomas; Montgomery, J.; Tarlov, A. R.

In: Health Services Research, Vol. 36, No. 6 I, 2001, p. 1059-1071.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Taira, DA, Safran, DG, Seto, TB, Rogers, WH, Inui, T, Montgomery, J & Tarlov, AR 2001, 'Do patient assessments of primary care differ by patient ethnicity?', Health Services Research, vol. 36, no. 6 I, pp. 1059-1071.
Taira DA, Safran DG, Seto TB, Rogers WH, Inui T, Montgomery J et al. Do patient assessments of primary care differ by patient ethnicity? Health Services Research. 2001;36(6 I):1059-1071.
Taira, D. A. ; Safran, D. G. ; Seto, T. B. ; Rogers, W. H. ; Inui, Thomas ; Montgomery, J. ; Tarlov, A. R. / Do patient assessments of primary care differ by patient ethnicity?. In: Health Services Research. 2001 ; Vol. 36, No. 6 I. pp. 1059-1071.
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