Do perceived barriers and benefits vary by mammography stage?

C. S. Skinner, Victoria Champion, R. Gonin, M. Hanna

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We investigated whether perceived barriers and benefits varied by stage of considering mammography. A total of 1,093 university employees completed questionnaires measuring constructs from the Transtheoretical and Health Belief Models. Action/Maintainers (the referent category) generally differed from Contemplators and Relapsers in perceived barriers and from Precontemplators and Contemplators in perceived benefits. Compared to Action/Maintainers, Relapsers were more likely to agree that mammograms take too much time; Contemplators and Relapsers were more likely to agree that mammograms are inconvenient, embarrassing, too costly, and hard to remember; and Precontemplators and Contemplators were less likely to agree that mammograms are painful. Lack of physician recommendation revealed the largest differences by stage (Precontemplators' odds ratios = 20.8, Contemplators'= 8.27, and Relapsers'= 4.05). For benefits, Precontemplators and Contemplators were less likely to agree that mammograms help find lumps early and find lumps before they can be felt; Precontemplators were less likely to agree that mammography can decrease mortality. Precontemplators may need more benefits-enhancing than barriers-reducing interventions. Contemplators may need persuasion that benefits are great while barriers are small. Relapsers may need barriers-reducing interventions. Physicians need to understand the importance of their role among women at all stages of considering mammography.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)65-75
Number of pages11
JournalPsychology, Health and Medicine
Volume2
Issue number1
StatePublished - Feb 1997

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Mammography
Persuasive Communication
Physicians
Odds Ratio
Mortality
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Do perceived barriers and benefits vary by mammography stage? / Skinner, C. S.; Champion, Victoria; Gonin, R.; Hanna, M.

In: Psychology, Health and Medicine, Vol. 2, No. 1, 02.1997, p. 65-75.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Skinner, CS, Champion, V, Gonin, R & Hanna, M 1997, 'Do perceived barriers and benefits vary by mammography stage?', Psychology, Health and Medicine, vol. 2, no. 1, pp. 65-75.
Skinner, C. S. ; Champion, Victoria ; Gonin, R. ; Hanna, M. / Do perceived barriers and benefits vary by mammography stage?. In: Psychology, Health and Medicine. 1997 ; Vol. 2, No. 1. pp. 65-75.
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