Do quadrupeds require a change in trunk posture to walk backward?

Joel A. Vilensky, Jennifer A. Cook

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous studies on cats walking backward have indicated that they adopt a presumably adaptive posture characterized by extreme dorsiflexion of the lumbar spine. Because humans do not show any marked postural changes during backward walking, we questioned whether the posture exhibited by cats during backward walking was in fact adaptive and whether it was typical of quadrupeds. We therefore compared forward and backward walking in three treadmill-trained dogs and found reduced temporal parameters during backward walking and a marked reduction in wrist palmarflexion during the swing phase of a backward step, but no change in trunk posture. We suggest that the aberrant posture exhibited by cats during backward walking is more related to ethological factors than to biomechanical ones. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)911-916
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Biomechanics
Volume33
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2000

Fingerprint

Exercise equipment
Posture
Walking
Cats
Wrist
Spine
Dogs

Keywords

  • Canine
  • Joints
  • Locomotion
  • Running

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Do quadrupeds require a change in trunk posture to walk backward? / Vilensky, Joel A.; Cook, Jennifer A.

In: Journal of Biomechanics, Vol. 33, No. 8, 01.08.2000, p. 911-916.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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