Do rodents have a gene encoding glycogenin-2, the liver isoform of the self-glucosylating initiator of glycogen synthesis?

L. Zhai, J. Schroeder, Alexander Skurat, Peter Roach

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The discovery of a second human gene, GYG2, encoding a liver-specific isoform of glycogenin, the self-glucosylating initiator of glycogen biosynthesis, raised the possibility for differential controls of this protein in liver and muscle. The new protein, glycogenin-2, had several properties similar biochemically to the muscle isoform, glycogenin-1, but unlike glycogenin-1, stable expression in fibro blasts led to a significant overaccumulation of glycogen. Ensuing attempts to generate reagents suitable for use with rodents, to examine the physiological regulation of glycogenin-2 by nutritional and hormonal factors, have been unsuccessful. Proof of a negative is difficult but the weight of the evidence is beginning to mitigate against the existence of a second glycogenin gene in rodents leading us to hypothesize that the presence of the GYG2 gene is limited to primates.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)87-91
Number of pages5
JournalIUBMB Life
Volume51
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Gene encoding
Glycogen
Liver
Rodentia
Protein Isoforms
Genes
Muscle
Muscles
Biosynthesis
Primates
glycogenin
Proteins
Weights and Measures

Keywords

  • Glycogen
  • Glycogenin
  • GYG
  • GYG2
  • Human
  • Mouse
  • Self-glucosylating protein

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Do rodents have a gene encoding glycogenin-2, the liver isoform of the self-glucosylating initiator of glycogen synthesis? / Zhai, L.; Schroeder, J.; Skurat, Alexander; Roach, Peter.

In: IUBMB Life, Vol. 51, No. 2, 2001, p. 87-91.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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