Does cognitive impairment influence quality of life among nursing home residents?

Kathleen Abrahamson, Daniel Clark, Anthony Perkins, Gregory Arling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: We investigated the relationship between cognitive status and quality of life (QOL) of Minnesota nursing home (NH) residents and the relationship between conventional or Alzheimer's special care unit (SCU) placement and QOL. The study may inform development of dementia-specific quality measures. Design and Methods: Data for analyses came from face-to-face interviews with a representative sample of 13,130 Minnesota NH residents collected through the 2007 Minnesota NH Resident Quality of Life and Consumer Satisfaction survey. We examined 7 QOL domains: comfort, meaningful activities, privacy, environment, individuality, autonomy, relationships, and a positive mood scale. We applied multilevel models (resident and facility) to examine the relationship between the resident's score on each QOL domain and the resident's cognitive impairment (CI) level and SCU placement after controlling for covariates, such as activities of daily living dependency, pain, depression or psychiatric diagnosis, and length of stay. Results: Residents with more severe CI reported higher QOL in the domains of comfort and environment and lower QOL in activities, individuality, privacy and meaningful relationships, and the mood scale. Residents on SCU reported higher QOL in the meaningful activities, comfort, environment, and autonomy domains but had lower mood scores. Implications: Our findings point to QOL domains that show significant variation by CI and thus may be of greatest interest to consumers, providers, advocacy groups, and other stakeholders committed to improving dementia care. Findings are particularly applicable to the development of NH quality indicators that more accurately represent the QOL of NH residents with CI.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)632-640
Number of pages9
JournalGerontologist
Volume52
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2012

Fingerprint

Nursing Homes
Quality of Life
Privacy
Individuality
Dementia
Consumer Advocacy
Cognitive Dysfunction
Activities of Daily Living
Mental Disorders
Length of Stay
Interviews
Depression
Pain

Keywords

  • Cognitive impairment
  • Nursing home
  • Quality of life
  • Special care unit

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Gerontology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Does cognitive impairment influence quality of life among nursing home residents? / Abrahamson, Kathleen; Clark, Daniel; Perkins, Anthony; Arling, Gregory.

In: Gerontologist, Vol. 52, No. 5, 10.2012, p. 632-640.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abrahamson, Kathleen ; Clark, Daniel ; Perkins, Anthony ; Arling, Gregory. / Does cognitive impairment influence quality of life among nursing home residents?. In: Gerontologist. 2012 ; Vol. 52, No. 5. pp. 632-640.
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