Does hormone therapy affect blood pressure changes in the diabetes prevention program?

Catherine Kim, Sherita H. Golden, Shengchun Kong, Bin Nan, Kieren Mather, Elizabeth Barrett-Connor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: This study aims to examine whether blood pressure reductions differ by estrogen use among overweight glucose-intolerant women. METHODS: We conducted a secondary analysis of Diabetes Prevention Program postmenopausal participants who used oral estrogen with or without progestogen at baseline and 1-year follow-up (n = 324) versus those who did not use oral estrogen with or without progestogen at either time point (n = 382). Changes in systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were examined by randomization arm (intensive lifestyle change [ILS], metformin 850 mg twice daily, or placebo). Associations between changes in blood pressure and changes in sex hormone-binding globulin, estradiol, testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone were also examined. RESULTS: Estrogen users and nonusers had similar prevalences of baseline hypertension (33% vs 34%, P = 0.82) and use of blood pressure medications at baseline (P = 0.25) and on follow-up (P = 0.10). Estrogen users and nonusers randomized to ILS had similar decreases in SBP (-3.3 vs-4.7 mm Hg, P = 0.45) and DBP (-3.1 vs-4.7 mm Hg, P = 0.16). Among estrogen users, women randomized to ILS had significant declines in SBP (P = 0.016) and DBP (P = 0.009) versus placebo. Among nonusers, women randomized to ILS had significant declines in DBP (P = 0.001) versus placebo, but declines in SBP were not significant (P = 0.11). Metformin was not associated with blood pressure reductions versus placebo regardless of estrogen therapy. Blood pressure changes were not associated with changes in sex hormones regardless of estrogen therapy. CONCLUSIONS: Among overweight women with dysglycemia, the magnitude of blood pressure reductions after ILS is unrelated to postmenopausal estrogen use.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)477-483
Number of pages7
JournalMenopause
Volume21
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Hormones
Blood Pressure
Estrogens
Therapeutics
Life Style
Placebos
Metformin
Progestins
Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin
Dehydroepiandrosterone
Gonadal Steroid Hormones
Random Allocation
Testosterone
Estradiol

Keywords

  • Hypertension
  • Lifestyle change
  • Postmenopausal hormone therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Does hormone therapy affect blood pressure changes in the diabetes prevention program? / Kim, Catherine; Golden, Sherita H.; Kong, Shengchun; Nan, Bin; Mather, Kieren; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth.

In: Menopause, Vol. 21, No. 5, 2014, p. 477-483.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kim, Catherine ; Golden, Sherita H. ; Kong, Shengchun ; Nan, Bin ; Mather, Kieren ; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth. / Does hormone therapy affect blood pressure changes in the diabetes prevention program?. In: Menopause. 2014 ; Vol. 21, No. 5. pp. 477-483.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE: This study aims to examine whether blood pressure reductions differ by estrogen use among overweight glucose-intolerant women. METHODS: We conducted a secondary analysis of Diabetes Prevention Program postmenopausal participants who used oral estrogen with or without progestogen at baseline and 1-year follow-up (n = 324) versus those who did not use oral estrogen with or without progestogen at either time point (n = 382). Changes in systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were examined by randomization arm (intensive lifestyle change [ILS], metformin 850 mg twice daily, or placebo). Associations between changes in blood pressure and changes in sex hormone-binding globulin, estradiol, testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone were also examined. RESULTS: Estrogen users and nonusers had similar prevalences of baseline hypertension (33{\%} vs 34{\%}, P = 0.82) and use of blood pressure medications at baseline (P = 0.25) and on follow-up (P = 0.10). Estrogen users and nonusers randomized to ILS had similar decreases in SBP (-3.3 vs-4.7 mm Hg, P = 0.45) and DBP (-3.1 vs-4.7 mm Hg, P = 0.16). Among estrogen users, women randomized to ILS had significant declines in SBP (P = 0.016) and DBP (P = 0.009) versus placebo. Among nonusers, women randomized to ILS had significant declines in DBP (P = 0.001) versus placebo, but declines in SBP were not significant (P = 0.11). Metformin was not associated with blood pressure reductions versus placebo regardless of estrogen therapy. Blood pressure changes were not associated with changes in sex hormones regardless of estrogen therapy. CONCLUSIONS: Among overweight women with dysglycemia, the magnitude of blood pressure reductions after ILS is unrelated to postmenopausal estrogen use.",
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N2 - OBJECTIVE: This study aims to examine whether blood pressure reductions differ by estrogen use among overweight glucose-intolerant women. METHODS: We conducted a secondary analysis of Diabetes Prevention Program postmenopausal participants who used oral estrogen with or without progestogen at baseline and 1-year follow-up (n = 324) versus those who did not use oral estrogen with or without progestogen at either time point (n = 382). Changes in systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were examined by randomization arm (intensive lifestyle change [ILS], metformin 850 mg twice daily, or placebo). Associations between changes in blood pressure and changes in sex hormone-binding globulin, estradiol, testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone were also examined. RESULTS: Estrogen users and nonusers had similar prevalences of baseline hypertension (33% vs 34%, P = 0.82) and use of blood pressure medications at baseline (P = 0.25) and on follow-up (P = 0.10). Estrogen users and nonusers randomized to ILS had similar decreases in SBP (-3.3 vs-4.7 mm Hg, P = 0.45) and DBP (-3.1 vs-4.7 mm Hg, P = 0.16). Among estrogen users, women randomized to ILS had significant declines in SBP (P = 0.016) and DBP (P = 0.009) versus placebo. Among nonusers, women randomized to ILS had significant declines in DBP (P = 0.001) versus placebo, but declines in SBP were not significant (P = 0.11). Metformin was not associated with blood pressure reductions versus placebo regardless of estrogen therapy. Blood pressure changes were not associated with changes in sex hormones regardless of estrogen therapy. CONCLUSIONS: Among overweight women with dysglycemia, the magnitude of blood pressure reductions after ILS is unrelated to postmenopausal estrogen use.

AB - OBJECTIVE: This study aims to examine whether blood pressure reductions differ by estrogen use among overweight glucose-intolerant women. METHODS: We conducted a secondary analysis of Diabetes Prevention Program postmenopausal participants who used oral estrogen with or without progestogen at baseline and 1-year follow-up (n = 324) versus those who did not use oral estrogen with or without progestogen at either time point (n = 382). Changes in systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were examined by randomization arm (intensive lifestyle change [ILS], metformin 850 mg twice daily, or placebo). Associations between changes in blood pressure and changes in sex hormone-binding globulin, estradiol, testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone were also examined. RESULTS: Estrogen users and nonusers had similar prevalences of baseline hypertension (33% vs 34%, P = 0.82) and use of blood pressure medications at baseline (P = 0.25) and on follow-up (P = 0.10). Estrogen users and nonusers randomized to ILS had similar decreases in SBP (-3.3 vs-4.7 mm Hg, P = 0.45) and DBP (-3.1 vs-4.7 mm Hg, P = 0.16). Among estrogen users, women randomized to ILS had significant declines in SBP (P = 0.016) and DBP (P = 0.009) versus placebo. Among nonusers, women randomized to ILS had significant declines in DBP (P = 0.001) versus placebo, but declines in SBP were not significant (P = 0.11). Metformin was not associated with blood pressure reductions versus placebo regardless of estrogen therapy. Blood pressure changes were not associated with changes in sex hormones regardless of estrogen therapy. CONCLUSIONS: Among overweight women with dysglycemia, the magnitude of blood pressure reductions after ILS is unrelated to postmenopausal estrogen use.

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