Does Payer Type Influence Pediatric Burn Outcomes? A National Study Using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids' Inpatient Database

Stephen Duquette, Tahereh Soleimani, Brett Hartman, Youssef Tahiri, Rajiv Sood, Sunil Tholpady

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pediatric burns are a considerable source of injury in the United States. Socioeconomic status has been demonstrated to influence other disease outcomes. The goal of this study was to analyze national pediatric burn outcomes based on payer type. A retrospective study was designed using the Kids' Inpatient Database (KID), years 2000 to 2009. Patients 18 years of age and under with Major Diagnostic code number 22 for burn were included. A total of 22,965 patients were identified, estimating 37,856 discharges. Descriptive and bivariate statistics were performed. Multiple regression analysis was used to assess correlation of payer type with complications and length of stay (LOS). The majority of patients were Medicaid (52.3%). Medicaid patients were younger (4.25, P <.05), had a higher rate of being in the first quartile of their zipcode's income (46.26%, P <.05), and contained a higher proportion of African-Americans (30.01%, P <.05). Overall complication rate was higher among Medicaid patients than private insurance and self-pay patients (6.64 vs 5.51 and 4.35%, respectively, P =.11). Logistic regression analysis of complications showed that Medicaid coverage (P <.001) was associated with complications. The geometric mean LOS among Medicaid patients was 3.7 days compared with private insurance (3.5 days) and self-pay patients (3.1 days). Medicaid patients had longer LOS and more complications. Regression analysis revealed that payer type was a factor in LOS and overall complication rate. Identifying dissimilar outcomes based on patient and injury characteristics is critical in providing information on how to improve those outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)314-320
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Burn Care and Research
Volume37
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2016

Fingerprint

Health Care Costs
Inpatients
Databases
Pediatrics
Medicaid
Length of Stay
Regression Analysis
Insurance
Wounds and Injuries
Burns
Social Class
African Americans
Retrospective Studies
Logistic Models

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine
  • Rehabilitation
  • Surgery

Cite this

Does Payer Type Influence Pediatric Burn Outcomes? A National Study Using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids' Inpatient Database. / Duquette, Stephen; Soleimani, Tahereh; Hartman, Brett; Tahiri, Youssef; Sood, Rajiv; Tholpady, Sunil.

In: Journal of Burn Care and Research, Vol. 37, No. 5, 01.09.2016, p. 314-320.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Duquette, Stephen ; Soleimani, Tahereh ; Hartman, Brett ; Tahiri, Youssef ; Sood, Rajiv ; Tholpady, Sunil. / Does Payer Type Influence Pediatric Burn Outcomes? A National Study Using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids' Inpatient Database. In: Journal of Burn Care and Research. 2016 ; Vol. 37, No. 5. pp. 314-320.
@article{0dc9b4f3a3ab4b908a20c4ebb550ba19,
title = "Does Payer Type Influence Pediatric Burn Outcomes? A National Study Using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids' Inpatient Database",
abstract = "Pediatric burns are a considerable source of injury in the United States. Socioeconomic status has been demonstrated to influence other disease outcomes. The goal of this study was to analyze national pediatric burn outcomes based on payer type. A retrospective study was designed using the Kids' Inpatient Database (KID), years 2000 to 2009. Patients 18 years of age and under with Major Diagnostic code number 22 for burn were included. A total of 22,965 patients were identified, estimating 37,856 discharges. Descriptive and bivariate statistics were performed. Multiple regression analysis was used to assess correlation of payer type with complications and length of stay (LOS). The majority of patients were Medicaid (52.3{\%}). Medicaid patients were younger (4.25, P <.05), had a higher rate of being in the first quartile of their zipcode's income (46.26{\%}, P <.05), and contained a higher proportion of African-Americans (30.01{\%}, P <.05). Overall complication rate was higher among Medicaid patients than private insurance and self-pay patients (6.64 vs 5.51 and 4.35{\%}, respectively, P =.11). Logistic regression analysis of complications showed that Medicaid coverage (P <.001) was associated with complications. The geometric mean LOS among Medicaid patients was 3.7 days compared with private insurance (3.5 days) and self-pay patients (3.1 days). Medicaid patients had longer LOS and more complications. Regression analysis revealed that payer type was a factor in LOS and overall complication rate. Identifying dissimilar outcomes based on patient and injury characteristics is critical in providing information on how to improve those outcomes.",
author = "Stephen Duquette and Tahereh Soleimani and Brett Hartman and Youssef Tahiri and Rajiv Sood and Sunil Tholpady",
year = "2016",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/BCR.0000000000000290",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "37",
pages = "314--320",
journal = "Journal of Burn Care and Research",
issn = "1559-047X",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Does Payer Type Influence Pediatric Burn Outcomes? A National Study Using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids' Inpatient Database

AU - Duquette, Stephen

AU - Soleimani, Tahereh

AU - Hartman, Brett

AU - Tahiri, Youssef

AU - Sood, Rajiv

AU - Tholpady, Sunil

PY - 2016/9/1

Y1 - 2016/9/1

N2 - Pediatric burns are a considerable source of injury in the United States. Socioeconomic status has been demonstrated to influence other disease outcomes. The goal of this study was to analyze national pediatric burn outcomes based on payer type. A retrospective study was designed using the Kids' Inpatient Database (KID), years 2000 to 2009. Patients 18 years of age and under with Major Diagnostic code number 22 for burn were included. A total of 22,965 patients were identified, estimating 37,856 discharges. Descriptive and bivariate statistics were performed. Multiple regression analysis was used to assess correlation of payer type with complications and length of stay (LOS). The majority of patients were Medicaid (52.3%). Medicaid patients were younger (4.25, P <.05), had a higher rate of being in the first quartile of their zipcode's income (46.26%, P <.05), and contained a higher proportion of African-Americans (30.01%, P <.05). Overall complication rate was higher among Medicaid patients than private insurance and self-pay patients (6.64 vs 5.51 and 4.35%, respectively, P =.11). Logistic regression analysis of complications showed that Medicaid coverage (P <.001) was associated with complications. The geometric mean LOS among Medicaid patients was 3.7 days compared with private insurance (3.5 days) and self-pay patients (3.1 days). Medicaid patients had longer LOS and more complications. Regression analysis revealed that payer type was a factor in LOS and overall complication rate. Identifying dissimilar outcomes based on patient and injury characteristics is critical in providing information on how to improve those outcomes.

AB - Pediatric burns are a considerable source of injury in the United States. Socioeconomic status has been demonstrated to influence other disease outcomes. The goal of this study was to analyze national pediatric burn outcomes based on payer type. A retrospective study was designed using the Kids' Inpatient Database (KID), years 2000 to 2009. Patients 18 years of age and under with Major Diagnostic code number 22 for burn were included. A total of 22,965 patients were identified, estimating 37,856 discharges. Descriptive and bivariate statistics were performed. Multiple regression analysis was used to assess correlation of payer type with complications and length of stay (LOS). The majority of patients were Medicaid (52.3%). Medicaid patients were younger (4.25, P <.05), had a higher rate of being in the first quartile of their zipcode's income (46.26%, P <.05), and contained a higher proportion of African-Americans (30.01%, P <.05). Overall complication rate was higher among Medicaid patients than private insurance and self-pay patients (6.64 vs 5.51 and 4.35%, respectively, P =.11). Logistic regression analysis of complications showed that Medicaid coverage (P <.001) was associated with complications. The geometric mean LOS among Medicaid patients was 3.7 days compared with private insurance (3.5 days) and self-pay patients (3.1 days). Medicaid patients had longer LOS and more complications. Regression analysis revealed that payer type was a factor in LOS and overall complication rate. Identifying dissimilar outcomes based on patient and injury characteristics is critical in providing information on how to improve those outcomes.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84986260181&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84986260181&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/BCR.0000000000000290

DO - 10.1097/BCR.0000000000000290

M3 - Article

C2 - 26284632

AN - SCOPUS:84986260181

VL - 37

SP - 314

EP - 320

JO - Journal of Burn Care and Research

JF - Journal of Burn Care and Research

SN - 1559-047X

IS - 5

ER -