Does routine intravenous glucagon administration facilitate colonoscopy? A randomized trial

Christopher S. Cutler, Douglas Rex, Robert H. Hawes, Glen Lehman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Previous studies on the routine use of glucagon in colonoscopy have produced conflicting results. Methods: Two separate studies were performed. In one study (Study 1), 80 consecutive patients were randomized after cecal intubation to receive 1 mg glucagon ( n = 41) or placebo ( n = 39), intravenously, in double-blind fashion. In a second study (Study 2) 90 sedated patients undergoing colonoscopy were randomized to receive 1 mg glucagon ( n = 46) or placebo ( n = 44), intravenously, just before colonoscope insertion. In each study, colonoscope insertion and withdrawal time, therapeutic intervention time, the presence and severity of colonic spasm, colonoscopy yield, and side effects were recorded. Results: Mean withdrawal time in Study 1 was similar in those receiving glucagon (6.85 min) and in those receiving placebo (6.92 min). Mean insertion time in Study 2 (5.07 min) was identical between groups. Spasm scores and colonoscopy yield did not differ between glucagon and placebo in either study. There was a trend toward more side effects (nausea and vomiting) with glucagon in Study 1. Glucagon did not facilitate insertion or withdrawal in the subset of patients with diverticulosis. Conclusions: Routine use of intravenous glucagon in a dosage of 1 mg does not facilitate colonoscopy by experienced examiners. (Gastrointest Endosc 1995;42:346-50.).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)346-350
Number of pages5
JournalGastrointestinal Endoscopy
Volume42
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995

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Colonoscopy
Glucagon
Intravenous Administration
Placebos
Colonoscopes
Spasm
Diverticulum
Intubation
Nausea
Vomiting

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Does routine intravenous glucagon administration facilitate colonoscopy? A randomized trial. / Cutler, Christopher S.; Rex, Douglas; Hawes, Robert H.; Lehman, Glen.

In: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, Vol. 42, No. 4, 1995, p. 346-350.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cutler, Christopher S. ; Rex, Douglas ; Hawes, Robert H. ; Lehman, Glen. / Does routine intravenous glucagon administration facilitate colonoscopy? A randomized trial. In: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. 1995 ; Vol. 42, No. 4. pp. 346-350.
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