Does the degree of preoperative mitral regurgitation predict survival or the need for mitral valve repair or replacement in patients with anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery?

John W. Brown, Mark Ruzmetov, John J. Parent, Mark D. Rodefeld, Mark W. Turrentine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery causes severe myocardial ischemia, global left ventricular dysfunction, and annular dilatation producing varying degrees of mitral regurgitation. Mitral regurgitation secondary to the left ventricular or papillary muscle dysfunction in infants will usually improve in the absence of ongoing ischemia. The aim of this study is to determine the influence of the degree of preoperative mitral regurgitation on the early and late outcomes of patients with anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery who underwent coronary reimplantation. Methods: Twenty-five patients underwent coronary reimplantation and 1 early patient had ligation during a 30-year period (median age, 4 months; range, 1 month to 16 years), with a median follow-up of 7 years (range, 4 months to 25 years). Before repair, 7 infants (27%) presented in extremis requiring ventilatory and inotropic support, and 17 patients (65%) presented with heart failure. Mitral regurgitation was present in all patients: trivial in 6 patients, mild in 12 patients, moderate in 5 patients, and severe in 3 patients. No patient underwent mitral valve repair or replacement at the time of anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery repair. Results: Hospital survival was 92%. Three patients underwent mitral valve repair or replacement at the mean time of 3.5 years (all with severe preoperative mitral regurgitation). The degree of mitral regurgitation gradually improved in all remaining patients with preoperative mild and moderate mitral regurgitation. Echocardiographic studies demonstrated improvement in left ventricular function in all children. None of the patients showed any evidence of supravalvar pulmonary stenosis as a result of their pulmonary artery reconstruction. Conclusion: Long-term clinical outcome and left ventricular function are good despite severe left ventricular dysfunction at presentation. Mitral valve repair or replacement is generally not necessary at the time of anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery repair. Significant residual mitral regurgitation is present in some patients and can usually be managed surgically at a later date depending on its degree of severity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)743-748
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume136
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2008

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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