Duration of polymerase Chain reaction-detectable DNA after treatment of Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Trichomonas vaginalis Infections in Women

James A. Williams, Susan Ofner, Byron Batteiger, J. Fortenberry, Barbara Van Der Pol

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: To avoid positive results attributable to residual DNA, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends avoiding repeat testing with nucleic-acid based tests within 3 weeks after treatment of chlamydial (Chlamydia trachomatis [CT]) or gonococcal (Neisseria gonorrhoeae [GC]) infection. We retrospectively analyzed the duration of detectable DNA from a longitudinal cohort of adolescent women after diagnosis and treatment of infection with CT, GC, or Trichomonas vaginalis (TV). METHODS: Vaginal swabs were obtained weekly from young women for up to 12 weeks (observation period) after treatment of CT, GC and TV infections. Swabs were tested using a commercially available first generation nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) for CT and GC, and a laboratory developed NAAT for TV. Kaplan-Meier statistics were used to estimate median time to the first negative DNA-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) result. RESULTS: Observation periods were available for analysis for 195, 82 and 102 treatments for CT, GC, and TV infection, respectively. Median time to a first negative PCR result for CT, GC, and TV was 9 (range 0-84), 6 (0-76), and 7 (0-84) days, and by day 21, 89%, 95%, and 85% were negative, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Data from this retrospective analysis indicate that greater than 85% of these young women did not have detectable CT, GC, or TV DNA by day 21 post-treatment. This data may be useful to clinicians for patient management and post-treatment testing purposes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)215-219
Number of pages5
JournalSexually Transmitted Diseases
Volume41
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2014

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Trichomonas Infections
Trichomonas vaginalis
Neisseria gonorrhoeae
Chlamydia trachomatis
Polymerase Chain Reaction
DNA
Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques
Therapeutics
Observation
DNA-Directed DNA Polymerase
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Infection
Nucleic Acids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Duration of polymerase Chain reaction-detectable DNA after treatment of Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Trichomonas vaginalis Infections in Women. / Williams, James A.; Ofner, Susan; Batteiger, Byron; Fortenberry, J.; Van Der Pol, Barbara.

In: Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Vol. 41, No. 3, 03.2014, p. 215-219.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: To avoid positive results attributable to residual DNA, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends avoiding repeat testing with nucleic-acid based tests within 3 weeks after treatment of chlamydial (Chlamydia trachomatis [CT]) or gonococcal (Neisseria gonorrhoeae [GC]) infection. We retrospectively analyzed the duration of detectable DNA from a longitudinal cohort of adolescent women after diagnosis and treatment of infection with CT, GC, or Trichomonas vaginalis (TV). METHODS: Vaginal swabs were obtained weekly from young women for up to 12 weeks (observation period) after treatment of CT, GC and TV infections. Swabs were tested using a commercially available first generation nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) for CT and GC, and a laboratory developed NAAT for TV. Kaplan-Meier statistics were used to estimate median time to the first negative DNA-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) result. RESULTS: Observation periods were available for analysis for 195, 82 and 102 treatments for CT, GC, and TV infection, respectively. Median time to a first negative PCR result for CT, GC, and TV was 9 (range 0-84), 6 (0-76), and 7 (0-84) days, and by day 21, 89{\%}, 95{\%}, and 85{\%} were negative, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Data from this retrospective analysis indicate that greater than 85{\%} of these young women did not have detectable CT, GC, or TV DNA by day 21 post-treatment. This data may be useful to clinicians for patient management and post-treatment testing purposes.",
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