Dynamic retention: A technique for closure of the complex abdomen in critically ill patients

Leonidas Koniaris, Richard J. Hendrickson, George Drugas, Peter Abt, Luke O. Schoeniger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Management of the open abdomen in the setting of massive visceral swelling or extensive intra-abdominal abscess may pose an extremely difficult surgical scenario. We herein describe the technique and results of dynamic-retention sutures used in 13 patients with abdominal catastrophes after trauma, vascular reconstruction, tumor extirpation, and intra-abdominal infection. Three of these patients died during their acute care hospitalization. The remaining 10 patients were discharged to home with no resultant fistulas and 1 recurrent hernia (10%). Dynamic-retention sutures provide a useful technique for the closure of the complex surgical abdomen. We observed a low complication rate. In properly selected patients, this technique avoids the use of mesh or additional surgical procedures such as skin grafting or plastic surgical reconstruction of the abdominal wall.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1359-1363
Number of pages5
JournalArchives of Surgery
Volume136
Issue number12
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Critical Illness
Abdomen
Sutures
Wound Closure Techniques
Intraabdominal Infections
Abdominal Abscess
Skin Transplantation
Abdominal Wall
Hernia
Fistula
Blood Vessels
Hospitalization
Wounds and Injuries
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Koniaris, L., Hendrickson, R. J., Drugas, G., Abt, P., & Schoeniger, L. O. (2001). Dynamic retention: A technique for closure of the complex abdomen in critically ill patients. Archives of Surgery, 136(12), 1359-1363.

Dynamic retention : A technique for closure of the complex abdomen in critically ill patients. / Koniaris, Leonidas; Hendrickson, Richard J.; Drugas, George; Abt, Peter; Schoeniger, Luke O.

In: Archives of Surgery, Vol. 136, No. 12, 2001, p. 1359-1363.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Koniaris, L, Hendrickson, RJ, Drugas, G, Abt, P & Schoeniger, LO 2001, 'Dynamic retention: A technique for closure of the complex abdomen in critically ill patients', Archives of Surgery, vol. 136, no. 12, pp. 1359-1363.
Koniaris, Leonidas ; Hendrickson, Richard J. ; Drugas, George ; Abt, Peter ; Schoeniger, Luke O. / Dynamic retention : A technique for closure of the complex abdomen in critically ill patients. In: Archives of Surgery. 2001 ; Vol. 136, No. 12. pp. 1359-1363.
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