Dynamics of virus-specific T cell immunity in pediatric liver transplant recipients

R. J. Arasaratnam, I. Tzannou, T. Gray, P. I. Aguayo-Hiraldo, M. Kuvalekar, S. Naik, A. Gaikwad, Hao Liu, T. Miloh, J. F. Vera, R. W. Himes, F. M. Munoz, A. M. Leen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Immunosuppression following solid organ transplantation (SOT) has a deleterious effect on cellular immunity leading to frequent and prolonged viral infections. To better understand the relationship between posttransplant immunosuppression and circulating virus-specific T cells, we prospectively monitored the frequency and function of T cells directed to a range of latent (CMV, EBV, HHV6, BK) and lytic (AdV) viruses in 16 children undergoing liver transplantation for up to 1 year posttransplant. Following transplant, there was an immediate decline in circulating virus-specific T cells, which recovered posttransplant, coincident with the introduction and subsequent routine tapering of immunosuppression. Furthermore, 12 of 14 infections/reactivations that occurred posttransplant were successfully controlled with immunosuppression reduction (and/or antiviral use) and in all cases we detected a temporal increase in the circulating frequency of virus-specific T cells directed against the infecting virus, which was absent in 2 cases where infections remained uncontrolled by the end of follow-up. Our study illustrates the dynamic changes in virus-specific T cells that occur in children following liver transplantation, driven both by active viral replication and modulation of immunosuppression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2238-2249
Number of pages12
JournalAmerican Journal of Transplantation
Volume18
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Immunity
Immunosuppression
Pediatrics
Viruses
T-Lymphocytes
Liver
Liver Transplantation
Human Herpesvirus 6
Organ Transplantation
Virus Diseases
Infection
Human Herpesvirus 4
Cellular Immunity
Antiviral Agents
Transplant Recipients
Transplants

Keywords

  • clinical research/practice
  • infectious disease
  • liver transplantation/hepatology
  • monitoring: immune
  • T cell biology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Transplantation
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Arasaratnam, R. J., Tzannou, I., Gray, T., Aguayo-Hiraldo, P. I., Kuvalekar, M., Naik, S., ... Leen, A. M. (2018). Dynamics of virus-specific T cell immunity in pediatric liver transplant recipients. American Journal of Transplantation, 18(9), 2238-2249. https://doi.org/10.1111/ajt.14967

Dynamics of virus-specific T cell immunity in pediatric liver transplant recipients. / Arasaratnam, R. J.; Tzannou, I.; Gray, T.; Aguayo-Hiraldo, P. I.; Kuvalekar, M.; Naik, S.; Gaikwad, A.; Liu, Hao; Miloh, T.; Vera, J. F.; Himes, R. W.; Munoz, F. M.; Leen, A. M.

In: American Journal of Transplantation, Vol. 18, No. 9, 01.09.2018, p. 2238-2249.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Arasaratnam, RJ, Tzannou, I, Gray, T, Aguayo-Hiraldo, PI, Kuvalekar, M, Naik, S, Gaikwad, A, Liu, H, Miloh, T, Vera, JF, Himes, RW, Munoz, FM & Leen, AM 2018, 'Dynamics of virus-specific T cell immunity in pediatric liver transplant recipients', American Journal of Transplantation, vol. 18, no. 9, pp. 2238-2249. https://doi.org/10.1111/ajt.14967
Arasaratnam RJ, Tzannou I, Gray T, Aguayo-Hiraldo PI, Kuvalekar M, Naik S et al. Dynamics of virus-specific T cell immunity in pediatric liver transplant recipients. American Journal of Transplantation. 2018 Sep 1;18(9):2238-2249. https://doi.org/10.1111/ajt.14967
Arasaratnam, R. J. ; Tzannou, I. ; Gray, T. ; Aguayo-Hiraldo, P. I. ; Kuvalekar, M. ; Naik, S. ; Gaikwad, A. ; Liu, Hao ; Miloh, T. ; Vera, J. F. ; Himes, R. W. ; Munoz, F. M. ; Leen, A. M. / Dynamics of virus-specific T cell immunity in pediatric liver transplant recipients. In: American Journal of Transplantation. 2018 ; Vol. 18, No. 9. pp. 2238-2249.
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