Early-onset tobacco use and suicide-related behavior – A prospective study from adolescence to young adulthood

Tellervo Korhonen, Elina Sihvola, Antti Latvala, Danielle M. Dick, Lea Pulkkinen, John Nurnberger, Richard J. Rose, Jaakko Kaprio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Developmental relationships between tobacco use and suicide-related behaviors (SRB) remain unclear. Our objective was to investigate the longitudinal associations of tobacco use in adolescence and SRB in adulthood. Methods Using a prospective design, we examined whether tobacco use in adolescence is associated with SRB (intentional self-injury, suicide ideation) in young adulthood in a population-based sample of 1330 twins (626 males, 704 females). The baseline and follow-up data were collected by professionally administered semi-structured poly-diagnostic interviews at ages 14 and 22, respectively. Results After adjusting for multiple potential confounders, those who reported early-onset of regular tobacco use had a significantly increased risk for intentional self-injury, such as cutting or burning, at age 22 (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 4.57, 95% CI 1.93–10.8) in comparison to those who had not at all initiated tobacco use. Also, daily cigarette smoking at baseline was associated with future intentional self-injury (AOR 4.45, 95% CI 2.04–9.70). Early-onset tobacco use was associated with suicidal ideation in females (AOR 3.69, 95% CI 1.56–8.72) but not in males. Considering any SRB, baseline daily smokers (AOR 2.13, 95% CI 1.12–4.07) and females with early onset of regular tobacco use (AOR 3.97, 95% CI 1.73–9.13) had an increased likelihood. Within-family analyses among twin pairs discordant for exposure and outcome controlling for familial confounds showed similar, albeit statistically non-significant, associations. Conclusion Early-onset tobacco use in adolescence is longitudinally associated with SRB (intentional self-injury and/or suicide ideation) in young adulthood, particularly among females. Further investigation may reveal whether this association has implications for prevention of SRB in adolescence and young adulthood.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)32-38
Number of pages7
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume79
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2018

Fingerprint

Tobacco
Tobacco Use
Suicide
Prospective Studies
Odds Ratio
Wounds and Injuries
Suicidal Ideation
Tobacco Products
Smoking
Association reactions
Interviews

Keywords

  • Self-injury
  • Smoking
  • Suicidal ideation
  • Tobacco
  • Twins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Toxicology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Early-onset tobacco use and suicide-related behavior – A prospective study from adolescence to young adulthood. / Korhonen, Tellervo; Sihvola, Elina; Latvala, Antti; Dick, Danielle M.; Pulkkinen, Lea; Nurnberger, John; Rose, Richard J.; Kaprio, Jaakko.

In: Addictive Behaviors, Vol. 79, 01.04.2018, p. 32-38.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Korhonen, Tellervo ; Sihvola, Elina ; Latvala, Antti ; Dick, Danielle M. ; Pulkkinen, Lea ; Nurnberger, John ; Rose, Richard J. ; Kaprio, Jaakko. / Early-onset tobacco use and suicide-related behavior – A prospective study from adolescence to young adulthood. In: Addictive Behaviors. 2018 ; Vol. 79. pp. 32-38.
@article{202be8cccce54e60bb51b21cac6ea0ef,
title = "Early-onset tobacco use and suicide-related behavior – A prospective study from adolescence to young adulthood",
abstract = "Background Developmental relationships between tobacco use and suicide-related behaviors (SRB) remain unclear. Our objective was to investigate the longitudinal associations of tobacco use in adolescence and SRB in adulthood. Methods Using a prospective design, we examined whether tobacco use in adolescence is associated with SRB (intentional self-injury, suicide ideation) in young adulthood in a population-based sample of 1330 twins (626 males, 704 females). The baseline and follow-up data were collected by professionally administered semi-structured poly-diagnostic interviews at ages 14 and 22, respectively. Results After adjusting for multiple potential confounders, those who reported early-onset of regular tobacco use had a significantly increased risk for intentional self-injury, such as cutting or burning, at age 22 (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 4.57, 95{\%} CI 1.93–10.8) in comparison to those who had not at all initiated tobacco use. Also, daily cigarette smoking at baseline was associated with future intentional self-injury (AOR 4.45, 95{\%} CI 2.04–9.70). Early-onset tobacco use was associated with suicidal ideation in females (AOR 3.69, 95{\%} CI 1.56–8.72) but not in males. Considering any SRB, baseline daily smokers (AOR 2.13, 95{\%} CI 1.12–4.07) and females with early onset of regular tobacco use (AOR 3.97, 95{\%} CI 1.73–9.13) had an increased likelihood. Within-family analyses among twin pairs discordant for exposure and outcome controlling for familial confounds showed similar, albeit statistically non-significant, associations. Conclusion Early-onset tobacco use in adolescence is longitudinally associated with SRB (intentional self-injury and/or suicide ideation) in young adulthood, particularly among females. Further investigation may reveal whether this association has implications for prevention of SRB in adolescence and young adulthood.",
keywords = "Self-injury, Smoking, Suicidal ideation, Tobacco, Twins",
author = "Tellervo Korhonen and Elina Sihvola and Antti Latvala and Dick, {Danielle M.} and Lea Pulkkinen and John Nurnberger and Rose, {Richard J.} and Jaakko Kaprio",
year = "2018",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.addbeh.2017.12.008",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "79",
pages = "32--38",
journal = "Addictive Behaviors",
issn = "0306-4603",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Early-onset tobacco use and suicide-related behavior – A prospective study from adolescence to young adulthood

AU - Korhonen, Tellervo

AU - Sihvola, Elina

AU - Latvala, Antti

AU - Dick, Danielle M.

AU - Pulkkinen, Lea

AU - Nurnberger, John

AU - Rose, Richard J.

AU - Kaprio, Jaakko

PY - 2018/4/1

Y1 - 2018/4/1

N2 - Background Developmental relationships between tobacco use and suicide-related behaviors (SRB) remain unclear. Our objective was to investigate the longitudinal associations of tobacco use in adolescence and SRB in adulthood. Methods Using a prospective design, we examined whether tobacco use in adolescence is associated with SRB (intentional self-injury, suicide ideation) in young adulthood in a population-based sample of 1330 twins (626 males, 704 females). The baseline and follow-up data were collected by professionally administered semi-structured poly-diagnostic interviews at ages 14 and 22, respectively. Results After adjusting for multiple potential confounders, those who reported early-onset of regular tobacco use had a significantly increased risk for intentional self-injury, such as cutting or burning, at age 22 (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 4.57, 95% CI 1.93–10.8) in comparison to those who had not at all initiated tobacco use. Also, daily cigarette smoking at baseline was associated with future intentional self-injury (AOR 4.45, 95% CI 2.04–9.70). Early-onset tobacco use was associated with suicidal ideation in females (AOR 3.69, 95% CI 1.56–8.72) but not in males. Considering any SRB, baseline daily smokers (AOR 2.13, 95% CI 1.12–4.07) and females with early onset of regular tobacco use (AOR 3.97, 95% CI 1.73–9.13) had an increased likelihood. Within-family analyses among twin pairs discordant for exposure and outcome controlling for familial confounds showed similar, albeit statistically non-significant, associations. Conclusion Early-onset tobacco use in adolescence is longitudinally associated with SRB (intentional self-injury and/or suicide ideation) in young adulthood, particularly among females. Further investigation may reveal whether this association has implications for prevention of SRB in adolescence and young adulthood.

AB - Background Developmental relationships between tobacco use and suicide-related behaviors (SRB) remain unclear. Our objective was to investigate the longitudinal associations of tobacco use in adolescence and SRB in adulthood. Methods Using a prospective design, we examined whether tobacco use in adolescence is associated with SRB (intentional self-injury, suicide ideation) in young adulthood in a population-based sample of 1330 twins (626 males, 704 females). The baseline and follow-up data were collected by professionally administered semi-structured poly-diagnostic interviews at ages 14 and 22, respectively. Results After adjusting for multiple potential confounders, those who reported early-onset of regular tobacco use had a significantly increased risk for intentional self-injury, such as cutting or burning, at age 22 (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 4.57, 95% CI 1.93–10.8) in comparison to those who had not at all initiated tobacco use. Also, daily cigarette smoking at baseline was associated with future intentional self-injury (AOR 4.45, 95% CI 2.04–9.70). Early-onset tobacco use was associated with suicidal ideation in females (AOR 3.69, 95% CI 1.56–8.72) but not in males. Considering any SRB, baseline daily smokers (AOR 2.13, 95% CI 1.12–4.07) and females with early onset of regular tobacco use (AOR 3.97, 95% CI 1.73–9.13) had an increased likelihood. Within-family analyses among twin pairs discordant for exposure and outcome controlling for familial confounds showed similar, albeit statistically non-significant, associations. Conclusion Early-onset tobacco use in adolescence is longitudinally associated with SRB (intentional self-injury and/or suicide ideation) in young adulthood, particularly among females. Further investigation may reveal whether this association has implications for prevention of SRB in adolescence and young adulthood.

KW - Self-injury

KW - Smoking

KW - Suicidal ideation

KW - Tobacco

KW - Twins

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85037700348&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85037700348&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.addbeh.2017.12.008

DO - 10.1016/j.addbeh.2017.12.008

M3 - Article

C2 - 29245024

AN - SCOPUS:85037700348

VL - 79

SP - 32

EP - 38

JO - Addictive Behaviors

JF - Addictive Behaviors

SN - 0306-4603

ER -