Ectopic prostatic tissue: Histogenesis and histopathological characteristics

Shams Halat, John Eble, David Grignon, Shannon Lacy, Rodolfo Montironi, Gregory T. Maclennan, Antonio Lopez-Beltran, Puay Hoon Tan, Lee A. Baldridge, Liang Cheng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims: To evaluate the histological and immunohistochemical characteristics of ectopic prostatic tissue. Methods and results: We studied 20 cases of ectopic prostate. In 85% (17/20) of the cases, the ectopic prostatic tissue was located in the bladder; in the remaining cases, it was located in the urethra. In 60% of the cases (12/20), no significant inflammatory or reactive/reparative changes were identified in the adjacent tissue. Immunohistochemical stains for prostate-specific antigen, prostate-specific acid phosphatase, and prostein were positive in the glandular epithelial cells of all cases. Stains for 34βE12 and p63 confirmed the presence of basal cells in all cases. There was no overexpression of α-methylacyl-CoA racemase in any of the cases. There was cytoplasmic luminal staining for CD10 and cytoplasmic staining for cytokeratin 18 in acinar cells in all cases. In cases in which followup data were available, no patient was found to have residual or recurrent ectopic prostatic tissue and none developed prostatic adenocarcinoma. Conclusions: Ectopic prostatic tissue is occasionally encountered in the lower urinary tract, most commonly in the bladder and urethra of males. Ectopic prostatic tissue has histological and immunohistochemical characteristics that are indistinguishable from those of normal prostatic tissue, and most likely represents the persistence of embryonic structures.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)750-758
Number of pages9
JournalHistopathology
Volume58
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2011

Fingerprint

Choristoma
Urethra
Prostate
Urinary Bladder
Coloring Agents
Staining and Labeling
Keratin-18
Racemases and Epimerases
Acinar Cells
Coenzyme A
Prostate-Specific Antigen
Acid Phosphatase
Urinary Tract
Adenocarcinoma
Embryonic Structures
Epithelial Cells

Keywords

  • Biomarkers
  • Differential diagnosis
  • Ectopic prostate
  • Genitourinary tract
  • Histogenesis
  • Polyps
  • Prostate
  • Urinary bladder

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Histology
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Ectopic prostatic tissue : Histogenesis and histopathological characteristics. / Halat, Shams; Eble, John; Grignon, David; Lacy, Shannon; Montironi, Rodolfo; Maclennan, Gregory T.; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Tan, Puay Hoon; Baldridge, Lee A.; Cheng, Liang.

In: Histopathology, Vol. 58, No. 5, 04.2011, p. 750-758.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Halat, S, Eble, J, Grignon, D, Lacy, S, Montironi, R, Maclennan, GT, Lopez-Beltran, A, Tan, PH, Baldridge, LA & Cheng, L 2011, 'Ectopic prostatic tissue: Histogenesis and histopathological characteristics', Histopathology, vol. 58, no. 5, pp. 750-758. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2559.2011.03799.x
Halat, Shams ; Eble, John ; Grignon, David ; Lacy, Shannon ; Montironi, Rodolfo ; Maclennan, Gregory T. ; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio ; Tan, Puay Hoon ; Baldridge, Lee A. ; Cheng, Liang. / Ectopic prostatic tissue : Histogenesis and histopathological characteristics. In: Histopathology. 2011 ; Vol. 58, No. 5. pp. 750-758.
@article{9e61e744953c481fbdce6ed3db17e754,
title = "Ectopic prostatic tissue: Histogenesis and histopathological characteristics",
abstract = "Aims: To evaluate the histological and immunohistochemical characteristics of ectopic prostatic tissue. Methods and results: We studied 20 cases of ectopic prostate. In 85{\%} (17/20) of the cases, the ectopic prostatic tissue was located in the bladder; in the remaining cases, it was located in the urethra. In 60{\%} of the cases (12/20), no significant inflammatory or reactive/reparative changes were identified in the adjacent tissue. Immunohistochemical stains for prostate-specific antigen, prostate-specific acid phosphatase, and prostein were positive in the glandular epithelial cells of all cases. Stains for 34βE12 and p63 confirmed the presence of basal cells in all cases. There was no overexpression of α-methylacyl-CoA racemase in any of the cases. There was cytoplasmic luminal staining for CD10 and cytoplasmic staining for cytokeratin 18 in acinar cells in all cases. In cases in which followup data were available, no patient was found to have residual or recurrent ectopic prostatic tissue and none developed prostatic adenocarcinoma. Conclusions: Ectopic prostatic tissue is occasionally encountered in the lower urinary tract, most commonly in the bladder and urethra of males. Ectopic prostatic tissue has histological and immunohistochemical characteristics that are indistinguishable from those of normal prostatic tissue, and most likely represents the persistence of embryonic structures.",
keywords = "Biomarkers, Differential diagnosis, Ectopic prostate, Genitourinary tract, Histogenesis, Polyps, Prostate, Urinary bladder",
author = "Shams Halat and John Eble and David Grignon and Shannon Lacy and Rodolfo Montironi and Maclennan, {Gregory T.} and Antonio Lopez-Beltran and Tan, {Puay Hoon} and Baldridge, {Lee A.} and Liang Cheng",
year = "2011",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1111/j.1365-2559.2011.03799.x",
language = "English",
volume = "58",
pages = "750--758",
journal = "Histopathology",
issn = "0309-0167",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Ectopic prostatic tissue

T2 - Histogenesis and histopathological characteristics

AU - Halat, Shams

AU - Eble, John

AU - Grignon, David

AU - Lacy, Shannon

AU - Montironi, Rodolfo

AU - Maclennan, Gregory T.

AU - Lopez-Beltran, Antonio

AU - Tan, Puay Hoon

AU - Baldridge, Lee A.

AU - Cheng, Liang

PY - 2011/4

Y1 - 2011/4

N2 - Aims: To evaluate the histological and immunohistochemical characteristics of ectopic prostatic tissue. Methods and results: We studied 20 cases of ectopic prostate. In 85% (17/20) of the cases, the ectopic prostatic tissue was located in the bladder; in the remaining cases, it was located in the urethra. In 60% of the cases (12/20), no significant inflammatory or reactive/reparative changes were identified in the adjacent tissue. Immunohistochemical stains for prostate-specific antigen, prostate-specific acid phosphatase, and prostein were positive in the glandular epithelial cells of all cases. Stains for 34βE12 and p63 confirmed the presence of basal cells in all cases. There was no overexpression of α-methylacyl-CoA racemase in any of the cases. There was cytoplasmic luminal staining for CD10 and cytoplasmic staining for cytokeratin 18 in acinar cells in all cases. In cases in which followup data were available, no patient was found to have residual or recurrent ectopic prostatic tissue and none developed prostatic adenocarcinoma. Conclusions: Ectopic prostatic tissue is occasionally encountered in the lower urinary tract, most commonly in the bladder and urethra of males. Ectopic prostatic tissue has histological and immunohistochemical characteristics that are indistinguishable from those of normal prostatic tissue, and most likely represents the persistence of embryonic structures.

AB - Aims: To evaluate the histological and immunohistochemical characteristics of ectopic prostatic tissue. Methods and results: We studied 20 cases of ectopic prostate. In 85% (17/20) of the cases, the ectopic prostatic tissue was located in the bladder; in the remaining cases, it was located in the urethra. In 60% of the cases (12/20), no significant inflammatory or reactive/reparative changes were identified in the adjacent tissue. Immunohistochemical stains for prostate-specific antigen, prostate-specific acid phosphatase, and prostein were positive in the glandular epithelial cells of all cases. Stains for 34βE12 and p63 confirmed the presence of basal cells in all cases. There was no overexpression of α-methylacyl-CoA racemase in any of the cases. There was cytoplasmic luminal staining for CD10 and cytoplasmic staining for cytokeratin 18 in acinar cells in all cases. In cases in which followup data were available, no patient was found to have residual or recurrent ectopic prostatic tissue and none developed prostatic adenocarcinoma. Conclusions: Ectopic prostatic tissue is occasionally encountered in the lower urinary tract, most commonly in the bladder and urethra of males. Ectopic prostatic tissue has histological and immunohistochemical characteristics that are indistinguishable from those of normal prostatic tissue, and most likely represents the persistence of embryonic structures.

KW - Biomarkers

KW - Differential diagnosis

KW - Ectopic prostate

KW - Genitourinary tract

KW - Histogenesis

KW - Polyps

KW - Prostate

KW - Urinary bladder

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79954570090&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79954570090&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1365-2559.2011.03799.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1365-2559.2011.03799.x

M3 - Article

C2 - 21438904

AN - SCOPUS:79954570090

VL - 58

SP - 750

EP - 758

JO - Histopathology

JF - Histopathology

SN - 0309-0167

IS - 5

ER -