Effect of disc lesion on microdamage accumulation in lumbar vertebrae under cyclic compression loading

K. Hasegawa, C. H. Turner, J. Chen, David Burr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A relationship between disc lesion and micro-damage accumulation in adjacent vertebrae during fatigue loading was investigated in a canine model. Eighteen functional spinal units obtained from 6 skeletally mature mongrel dogs were divided into 3 groups: I, control (without loading) (n = 6); II, loading with normal disc (n = 6); and III, loading with disc lesion created by nucleotomy (n = 6). Physiologic cyclic compression was performed for 105 cycles, and fractional trabecular bone area and microcrack density in the vertebrae were measured. There was a significant difference in microcrack density among groups and regions (p <0.0001) with significantly more microdamage in functional spinal units with disc lesions than in the other 2 groups (p <0.0001). The microcracks were distributed predominantly in the vertebral region adjacent to the nucleotomized disc (p <0.005). There was a negative association of microcrack density with fractional trabecular bone area (R2 = 0.236, p <0.02). These results support the hypothesis that disc degeneration contributes to vertebral fragility by causing microdamage accumulation, especially in vertebrae with low bone mass.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)190-198
Number of pages9
JournalClinical Orthopaedics and Related Research
Issue number311
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

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Lumbar Vertebrae
Spine
Intervertebral Disc Degeneration
Fatigue
Canidae
Dogs
Bone and Bones
Control Groups
Cancellous Bone

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

Effect of disc lesion on microdamage accumulation in lumbar vertebrae under cyclic compression loading. / Hasegawa, K.; Turner, C. H.; Chen, J.; Burr, David.

In: Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, No. 311, 1995, p. 190-198.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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