Effect of electroconvulsive therapy on cardiac rhythm, conduction and repolarization

P. J. Troup, J. G. Small, V. Milstein, I. F. Small, D. P. Zipes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Because sympathetic stimulation has been implicated in the genesis of arrhythmias, we studied the effects on arrhythmias of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Fifteen psychiatric patients (male: 8, female: 7, age: 19-51, mean: 29.8) without known heart disease underwent 24 hr Holter recordings before, during and after ECT (25 episodes). All patients were taking psychotropic drugs and received atropine (0.4-1.2 mg, mean: 1.1 mg IV), methohexital, and succinylcholine prior to ECT. Following ECT, mean maximum heart rate increased (106 ± 3.2 to 142 ± 6.0 beats/min, p <.001). PR interval decreased (149 ± 3.3 to 131 ± 3.7 msec, p <.001) and QT(C) interval increased (432 ± 6.5 to 454 ± 9.7 msec, p <.001) compared to values obtained after atropine administration. Mean PVC or PAC frequency immediately after ECT or per 24 hr did not change significantly (PVC per 24 hr 6.8 ± 3.2 to 10.4 ±6.4, 6.44, NS; PAC per 24 hr 0.4 ± 0.3 to 0.3 ± 0.2 NS) and no complex arrhythmias were noted. Rate and PR changes suggest adrenergic effects of ECT and QT(c) increase may be due to imbalanced sympathetic discharge. Autonomic stimulation produced by ECT did not induce arrhythmias in these patients without heart disease. The possible antiarrhythmic role of psychotropic agents or premedication is unknown.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)172-177
Number of pages6
JournalPACE - Pacing and Clinical Electrophysiology
Volume1
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1978

Fingerprint

Electroconvulsive Therapy
Cardiac Arrhythmias
Atropine
Polyvinyl Chloride
Heart Diseases
Methohexital
Succinylcholine
Premedication
Psychotropic Drugs
Adrenergic Agents
Psychiatry
Heart Rate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Troup, P. J., Small, J. G., Milstein, V., Small, I. F., & Zipes, D. P. (1978). Effect of electroconvulsive therapy on cardiac rhythm, conduction and repolarization. PACE - Pacing and Clinical Electrophysiology, 1(2), 172-177.

Effect of electroconvulsive therapy on cardiac rhythm, conduction and repolarization. / Troup, P. J.; Small, J. G.; Milstein, V.; Small, I. F.; Zipes, D. P.

In: PACE - Pacing and Clinical Electrophysiology, Vol. 1, No. 2, 1978, p. 172-177.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Troup, PJ, Small, JG, Milstein, V, Small, IF & Zipes, DP 1978, 'Effect of electroconvulsive therapy on cardiac rhythm, conduction and repolarization', PACE - Pacing and Clinical Electrophysiology, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. 172-177.
Troup, P. J. ; Small, J. G. ; Milstein, V. ; Small, I. F. ; Zipes, D. P. / Effect of electroconvulsive therapy on cardiac rhythm, conduction and repolarization. In: PACE - Pacing and Clinical Electrophysiology. 1978 ; Vol. 1, No. 2. pp. 172-177.
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