Effect of intermittent versus continuous enteral feeding on energy expenditure in premature infants

Judith Grant, Scott Denne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine whether premature infants have higher rates of energy expenditure and diet-induced thermogenesis during intermittent feeding compared with continuous feeding. Using open-circult respiratory calorimetry, we measured energy expenditure in 11 premature newborn infants on 2 successive days for 5 to 7 hours during and after either intermittent or contiuous feeding. Infants were fed the same quantity of formula each day, either for 5 minutes or by continuous drip for 2 to 3 hours. The order of feeding type was randomized. No response of diet-induced thermogenesis to continuous feeding was found, whereas a peak increase of 15% over baseline was observed after intermittent feeding. Overall energy expenditure during the study period was significantly greater after intermittent compared with continuous feeding (2.18±0.07 kcal/kg per hour vs 2.09±0.05 kcal/kg per hour; p<0.05). Thus there was a mean 4% difference (range up to 17%) in energy expenditure between the two feeding modes. These results are similar to those obtained with adults and support the concept of the increased energy efficiency of continuous feeding. Further study will be necessary to document whether the increased energy efficiency provided by continuous feeding may be clinically significant.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)928-932
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume118
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1991

Fingerprint

Enteral Nutrition
Premature Infants
Energy Metabolism
Thermogenesis
Diet
Calorimetry
Newborn Infant

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Effect of intermittent versus continuous enteral feeding on energy expenditure in premature infants. / Grant, Judith; Denne, Scott.

In: Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 118, No. 6, 1991, p. 928-932.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{664275242bb54775ac147fde4a323b37,
title = "Effect of intermittent versus continuous enteral feeding on energy expenditure in premature infants",
abstract = "The purpose of this study was to examine whether premature infants have higher rates of energy expenditure and diet-induced thermogenesis during intermittent feeding compared with continuous feeding. Using open-circult respiratory calorimetry, we measured energy expenditure in 11 premature newborn infants on 2 successive days for 5 to 7 hours during and after either intermittent or contiuous feeding. Infants were fed the same quantity of formula each day, either for 5 minutes or by continuous drip for 2 to 3 hours. The order of feeding type was randomized. No response of diet-induced thermogenesis to continuous feeding was found, whereas a peak increase of 15{\%} over baseline was observed after intermittent feeding. Overall energy expenditure during the study period was significantly greater after intermittent compared with continuous feeding (2.18±0.07 kcal/kg per hour vs 2.09±0.05 kcal/kg per hour; p<0.05). Thus there was a mean 4{\%} difference (range up to 17{\%}) in energy expenditure between the two feeding modes. These results are similar to those obtained with adults and support the concept of the increased energy efficiency of continuous feeding. Further study will be necessary to document whether the increased energy efficiency provided by continuous feeding may be clinically significant.",
author = "Judith Grant and Scott Denne",
year = "1991",
doi = "10.1016/S0022-3476(05)82213-9",
language = "English",
volume = "118",
pages = "928--932",
journal = "Journal of Pediatrics",
issn = "0022-3476",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of intermittent versus continuous enteral feeding on energy expenditure in premature infants

AU - Grant, Judith

AU - Denne, Scott

PY - 1991

Y1 - 1991

N2 - The purpose of this study was to examine whether premature infants have higher rates of energy expenditure and diet-induced thermogenesis during intermittent feeding compared with continuous feeding. Using open-circult respiratory calorimetry, we measured energy expenditure in 11 premature newborn infants on 2 successive days for 5 to 7 hours during and after either intermittent or contiuous feeding. Infants were fed the same quantity of formula each day, either for 5 minutes or by continuous drip for 2 to 3 hours. The order of feeding type was randomized. No response of diet-induced thermogenesis to continuous feeding was found, whereas a peak increase of 15% over baseline was observed after intermittent feeding. Overall energy expenditure during the study period was significantly greater after intermittent compared with continuous feeding (2.18±0.07 kcal/kg per hour vs 2.09±0.05 kcal/kg per hour; p<0.05). Thus there was a mean 4% difference (range up to 17%) in energy expenditure between the two feeding modes. These results are similar to those obtained with adults and support the concept of the increased energy efficiency of continuous feeding. Further study will be necessary to document whether the increased energy efficiency provided by continuous feeding may be clinically significant.

AB - The purpose of this study was to examine whether premature infants have higher rates of energy expenditure and diet-induced thermogenesis during intermittent feeding compared with continuous feeding. Using open-circult respiratory calorimetry, we measured energy expenditure in 11 premature newborn infants on 2 successive days for 5 to 7 hours during and after either intermittent or contiuous feeding. Infants were fed the same quantity of formula each day, either for 5 minutes or by continuous drip for 2 to 3 hours. The order of feeding type was randomized. No response of diet-induced thermogenesis to continuous feeding was found, whereas a peak increase of 15% over baseline was observed after intermittent feeding. Overall energy expenditure during the study period was significantly greater after intermittent compared with continuous feeding (2.18±0.07 kcal/kg per hour vs 2.09±0.05 kcal/kg per hour; p<0.05). Thus there was a mean 4% difference (range up to 17%) in energy expenditure between the two feeding modes. These results are similar to those obtained with adults and support the concept of the increased energy efficiency of continuous feeding. Further study will be necessary to document whether the increased energy efficiency provided by continuous feeding may be clinically significant.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0025810760&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0025810760&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0022-3476(05)82213-9

DO - 10.1016/S0022-3476(05)82213-9

M3 - Article

VL - 118

SP - 928

EP - 932

JO - Journal of Pediatrics

JF - Journal of Pediatrics

SN - 0022-3476

IS - 6

ER -