Effect of overpressure and pulse repetition frequency on cavitation in shock wave lithotripsy

Oleg A. Sapozhnikov, Vera A. Khokhlova, Michael R. Bailey, James Williams, James A. McAteer, Robin O. Cleveland, Lawrence A. Crum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

93 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cavitation appears to contribute to tissue injury in lithotripsy. Reports have shown that increasing pulse repetition frequency [(PRF) 0.5-100 Hz] increases tissue damage and increasing static pressure (1-3 bar) reduces cell damage without decreasing stone comminution. Our hypothesis is that overpressure or slow PRF causes unstabilized bubbles produced by one shock pulse to dissolve before they nucleate cavitation by subsequent shock pulses. The effects of PRF and overpressure on bubble dynamics and lifetimes were studied experimentally with passive cavitation detection, high-speed photography, and B-mode ultrasound and theoretically. Overpressure significantly reduced calculated (100-2 s) and measured (55-0.5 s) bubble lifetimes. At 1.5 bar static pressure, a dense bubble cluster was measured with clinically high PRF (2-3 Hz) and a sparse cluster with clinically low PRF (0.5-1 Hz), indicating bubble lifetimes of 0.5-1 s, consistent with calculations. In contrast to cavitation in water, high-speed photography showed that overpressure did not suppress cavitation of bubbles stabilized on a cracked surface. These results suggest that a judicious use of overpressure and PRF in lithotripsy could reduce cavitation damage of tissue while maintaining cavitation comminution of stones.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1183-1195
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
Volume112
Issue number3 I
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2002

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overpressure
cavitation flow
shock waves
repetition
bubbles
pulses
high speed photography
comminution
static pressure
damage
life (durability)
shock
rocks
Waves
Pulse
Bubble
causes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

Cite this

Sapozhnikov, O. A., Khokhlova, V. A., Bailey, M. R., Williams, J., McAteer, J. A., Cleveland, R. O., & Crum, L. A. (2002). Effect of overpressure and pulse repetition frequency on cavitation in shock wave lithotripsy. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 112(3 I), 1183-1195. https://doi.org/10.1121/1.1500754

Effect of overpressure and pulse repetition frequency on cavitation in shock wave lithotripsy. / Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Bailey, Michael R.; Williams, James; McAteer, James A.; Cleveland, Robin O.; Crum, Lawrence A.

In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 112, No. 3 I, 09.2002, p. 1183-1195.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sapozhnikov, OA, Khokhlova, VA, Bailey, MR, Williams, J, McAteer, JA, Cleveland, RO & Crum, LA 2002, 'Effect of overpressure and pulse repetition frequency on cavitation in shock wave lithotripsy', Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, vol. 112, no. 3 I, pp. 1183-1195. https://doi.org/10.1121/1.1500754
Sapozhnikov, Oleg A. ; Khokhlova, Vera A. ; Bailey, Michael R. ; Williams, James ; McAteer, James A. ; Cleveland, Robin O. ; Crum, Lawrence A. / Effect of overpressure and pulse repetition frequency on cavitation in shock wave lithotripsy. In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 2002 ; Vol. 112, No. 3 I. pp. 1183-1195.
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