Effect of shock wave lithotripsy on renal hemodynamics

Rajash Handa, Lynn R. Willis, Andrew Evan, Bret A. Connors

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) can injure tissue and decrease blood flow in the SWL-treated kidney, both tissue and functional effects being largely localized to the region targeted with shock waves (SWs). A novel method of limiting SWL-induced tissue injury is to employ the "protection" protocol, where the kidney is pretreated with low-energy SWs prior to the application of a standard clinical dose of high-energy SWs. Resistive index measurements of renal vascular resistance/impedance to blood flow during SWL treatment protocols revealed that a standard clinical dose of high-energy SWs did not alter RI during SW application. However, there was an interaction between low- and high-energy SWL treatment phases of the "protection" protocol such that an increase in RI (vasoconstriction) was observed during the later half of SW application, a time when tissue damage is occurring during the standard high-energy SWL protocol. We suggest that renal vasoconstriction may be responsible for reducing the degree of tissue damage that normally results from a standard clinical dose of high-energy SWs.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAIP Conference Proceedings
Pages249-255
Number of pages7
Volume1049
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008
Event2nd International Urolithiasis Research Symposium - Indianapolis, IN, United States
Duration: Apr 17 2008Apr 18 2008

Other

Other2nd International Urolithiasis Research Symposium
CountryUnited States
CityIndianapolis, IN
Period4/17/084/18/08

Fingerprint

hemodynamics
shock waves
vasoconstriction
kidneys
blood flow
energy
dosage
damage

Keywords

  • "protection" protocol
  • Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy
  • PET imaging
  • Resistive index
  • Sonography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Handa, R., Willis, L. R., Evan, A., & Connors, B. A. (2008). Effect of shock wave lithotripsy on renal hemodynamics. In AIP Conference Proceedings (Vol. 1049, pp. 249-255) https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2998031

Effect of shock wave lithotripsy on renal hemodynamics. / Handa, Rajash; Willis, Lynn R.; Evan, Andrew; Connors, Bret A.

AIP Conference Proceedings. Vol. 1049 2008. p. 249-255.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Handa, R, Willis, LR, Evan, A & Connors, BA 2008, Effect of shock wave lithotripsy on renal hemodynamics. in AIP Conference Proceedings. vol. 1049, pp. 249-255, 2nd International Urolithiasis Research Symposium, Indianapolis, IN, United States, 4/17/08. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2998031
Handa R, Willis LR, Evan A, Connors BA. Effect of shock wave lithotripsy on renal hemodynamics. In AIP Conference Proceedings. Vol. 1049. 2008. p. 249-255 https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2998031
Handa, Rajash ; Willis, Lynn R. ; Evan, Andrew ; Connors, Bret A. / Effect of shock wave lithotripsy on renal hemodynamics. AIP Conference Proceedings. Vol. 1049 2008. pp. 249-255
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