Effects of 21st birthday brief interventions on college student celebratory drinking: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Katarzyna T. Steinka-Fry, Emily E. Tanner-Smith, Sean Grant

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Introduction: College students' 21st birthday celebrations often involve consumption of extreme amounts of alcohol as well as alcohol-related risks. This systematic review aims to determine whether birthday-focused, individually-targeted, no-contact (email or letter-based) brief alcohol interventions (BAIs) reduce college students' 21st birthday celebratory drinking. Methods: A systematic search identified 9 randomized evaluations with 10 interventions to reduce 21st birthday drinking. Quantity of alcohol consumed and estimated blood alcohol concentration (BAC) were measured. Random-effects meta-analysis was used to summarize the effects of the interventions. Results: There was no evidence that birthday-focused BAIs reduce quantities of alcohol consumed during birthday celebrations (g - = 0.05, 95% CI [- 0.03 to 0.13]). The interventions were associated with significant reductions in estimated BAC levels (g - = 0.20, 95% CI [0.07 to 0.33]), but this effect was small in absolute terms. The quality of this body of evidence was very low, as evaluated using the GRADE approach. In particular, it was limited by substantial participant attrition post-randomization due to included studies' recruitment and randomization procedures. Conclusions: There is no evidence that birthday-focused, individually-targeted BAIs reduce the quantity of alcohol consumed by students during 21st birthday celebrations, although these interventions may yield small beneficial effects on estimated BAC. Many methodological concerns were identified in included studies. This area of research would benefit from theory-based RCTs that are well-designed and executed. Future research should also investigate strategies other than birthday-focused, individually-targeted, brief interventions to curb 21st birthday celebratory drinking.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13-21
Number of pages9
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume50
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Meta-Analysis
Alcohols
Students
Drinking
Random Allocation
Blood
Alcohol Drinking in College
Curbs
Electronic mail
Blood Alcohol Content
Research

Keywords

  • 21st birthday celebration
  • Alcohol
  • Binge drinking
  • College students
  • Meta-analysis
  • Prevention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Toxicology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Effects of 21st birthday brief interventions on college student celebratory drinking : A systematic review and meta-analysis. / Steinka-Fry, Katarzyna T.; Tanner-Smith, Emily E.; Grant, Sean.

In: Addictive Behaviors, Vol. 50, 01.11.2015, p. 13-21.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

@article{049a8e0139494982bdc7c69a8b29b522,
title = "Effects of 21st birthday brief interventions on college student celebratory drinking: A systematic review and meta-analysis",
abstract = "Introduction: College students' 21st birthday celebrations often involve consumption of extreme amounts of alcohol as well as alcohol-related risks. This systematic review aims to determine whether birthday-focused, individually-targeted, no-contact (email or letter-based) brief alcohol interventions (BAIs) reduce college students' 21st birthday celebratory drinking. Methods: A systematic search identified 9 randomized evaluations with 10 interventions to reduce 21st birthday drinking. Quantity of alcohol consumed and estimated blood alcohol concentration (BAC) were measured. Random-effects meta-analysis was used to summarize the effects of the interventions. Results: There was no evidence that birthday-focused BAIs reduce quantities of alcohol consumed during birthday celebrations (g - = 0.05, 95{\%} CI [- 0.03 to 0.13]). The interventions were associated with significant reductions in estimated BAC levels (g - = 0.20, 95{\%} CI [0.07 to 0.33]), but this effect was small in absolute terms. The quality of this body of evidence was very low, as evaluated using the GRADE approach. In particular, it was limited by substantial participant attrition post-randomization due to included studies' recruitment and randomization procedures. Conclusions: There is no evidence that birthday-focused, individually-targeted BAIs reduce the quantity of alcohol consumed by students during 21st birthday celebrations, although these interventions may yield small beneficial effects on estimated BAC. Many methodological concerns were identified in included studies. This area of research would benefit from theory-based RCTs that are well-designed and executed. Future research should also investigate strategies other than birthday-focused, individually-targeted, brief interventions to curb 21st birthday celebratory drinking.",
keywords = "21st birthday celebration, Alcohol, Binge drinking, College students, Meta-analysis, Prevention",
author = "Steinka-Fry, {Katarzyna T.} and Tanner-Smith, {Emily E.} and Sean Grant",
year = "2015",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.addbeh.2015.06.001",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "50",
pages = "13--21",
journal = "Addictive Behaviors",
issn = "0306-4603",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of 21st birthday brief interventions on college student celebratory drinking

T2 - A systematic review and meta-analysis

AU - Steinka-Fry, Katarzyna T.

AU - Tanner-Smith, Emily E.

AU - Grant, Sean

PY - 2015/11/1

Y1 - 2015/11/1

N2 - Introduction: College students' 21st birthday celebrations often involve consumption of extreme amounts of alcohol as well as alcohol-related risks. This systematic review aims to determine whether birthday-focused, individually-targeted, no-contact (email or letter-based) brief alcohol interventions (BAIs) reduce college students' 21st birthday celebratory drinking. Methods: A systematic search identified 9 randomized evaluations with 10 interventions to reduce 21st birthday drinking. Quantity of alcohol consumed and estimated blood alcohol concentration (BAC) were measured. Random-effects meta-analysis was used to summarize the effects of the interventions. Results: There was no evidence that birthday-focused BAIs reduce quantities of alcohol consumed during birthday celebrations (g - = 0.05, 95% CI [- 0.03 to 0.13]). The interventions were associated with significant reductions in estimated BAC levels (g - = 0.20, 95% CI [0.07 to 0.33]), but this effect was small in absolute terms. The quality of this body of evidence was very low, as evaluated using the GRADE approach. In particular, it was limited by substantial participant attrition post-randomization due to included studies' recruitment and randomization procedures. Conclusions: There is no evidence that birthday-focused, individually-targeted BAIs reduce the quantity of alcohol consumed by students during 21st birthday celebrations, although these interventions may yield small beneficial effects on estimated BAC. Many methodological concerns were identified in included studies. This area of research would benefit from theory-based RCTs that are well-designed and executed. Future research should also investigate strategies other than birthday-focused, individually-targeted, brief interventions to curb 21st birthday celebratory drinking.

AB - Introduction: College students' 21st birthday celebrations often involve consumption of extreme amounts of alcohol as well as alcohol-related risks. This systematic review aims to determine whether birthday-focused, individually-targeted, no-contact (email or letter-based) brief alcohol interventions (BAIs) reduce college students' 21st birthday celebratory drinking. Methods: A systematic search identified 9 randomized evaluations with 10 interventions to reduce 21st birthday drinking. Quantity of alcohol consumed and estimated blood alcohol concentration (BAC) were measured. Random-effects meta-analysis was used to summarize the effects of the interventions. Results: There was no evidence that birthday-focused BAIs reduce quantities of alcohol consumed during birthday celebrations (g - = 0.05, 95% CI [- 0.03 to 0.13]). The interventions were associated with significant reductions in estimated BAC levels (g - = 0.20, 95% CI [0.07 to 0.33]), but this effect was small in absolute terms. The quality of this body of evidence was very low, as evaluated using the GRADE approach. In particular, it was limited by substantial participant attrition post-randomization due to included studies' recruitment and randomization procedures. Conclusions: There is no evidence that birthday-focused, individually-targeted BAIs reduce the quantity of alcohol consumed by students during 21st birthday celebrations, although these interventions may yield small beneficial effects on estimated BAC. Many methodological concerns were identified in included studies. This area of research would benefit from theory-based RCTs that are well-designed and executed. Future research should also investigate strategies other than birthday-focused, individually-targeted, brief interventions to curb 21st birthday celebratory drinking.

KW - 21st birthday celebration

KW - Alcohol

KW - Binge drinking

KW - College students

KW - Meta-analysis

KW - Prevention

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84935006824&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84935006824&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.addbeh.2015.06.001

DO - 10.1016/j.addbeh.2015.06.001

M3 - Review article

C2 - 26093502

AN - SCOPUS:84935006824

VL - 50

SP - 13

EP - 21

JO - Addictive Behaviors

JF - Addictive Behaviors

SN - 0306-4603

ER -