Effects of a care coordination intervention with children with neurodevelopmental disabilities and their families

Jeanne W. McAllister, Rebecca Mc Nally Keehn, Rylin Rodgers, Philani Brian Mpofu, Patrick Monahan, Thomas Lock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Care coordination is integral to improving the health of children and families. Using a Shared Plan of Care (SPoC) as a care coordination activity is recommended, but related research on outcomes in pediatric populations with complex medical conditions is scarce. Objective: This study explores family outcomes associated with implementation of a care coordination/SPoC intervention with a population of children with neurodevelopmental disabilities and their families. Methods: Children aged 2 to 10 years with a neurodevelopmental disability (autism spectrum disorder: 60.9%; global developmental delay/intellectual disability: 39.1%) were referred by pediatric subspecialty programs for care coordination. The intervention included previsit assessments, planned care visits, SPoC development, and 6-month care coordination. A single-group, repeated-measures design was used to evaluate model feasibility and effects on care coordination access, SPoC use, family/clinician goals and needs met, family-professional partnerships, family empowerment, and worry. Times 1 and 2 survey data were collected from a total of 70 families. Results: Analysis shows significant improvement in care coordination access, SPoC use, goals achieved, needs met, family empowerment, and reduced worry. There was no significant change in family-professional partnerships and reported SPoC use. Conclusion: Findings provide preliminary evidence that a care coordination model using a family-centered, goal-oriented SPoC is a feasible and effective approach with a cohort of children with complex neurodevelopmental disorders and is associated with improved family outcomes. Replication studies are warranted and should include a control group, prolonged time period, additional validated outcome measures, and measurement of costs and professional impact.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)471-480
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics
Volume39
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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Disabled Children
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Pediatrics
Family Health
Intellectual Disability
Population
Costs and Cost Analysis
Control Groups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Effects of a care coordination intervention with children with neurodevelopmental disabilities and their families. / McAllister, Jeanne W.; Keehn, Rebecca Mc Nally; Rodgers, Rylin; Mpofu, Philani Brian; Monahan, Patrick; Lock, Thomas.

In: Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, Vol. 39, No. 6, 01.01.2018, p. 471-480.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McAllister, Jeanne W. ; Keehn, Rebecca Mc Nally ; Rodgers, Rylin ; Mpofu, Philani Brian ; Monahan, Patrick ; Lock, Thomas. / Effects of a care coordination intervention with children with neurodevelopmental disabilities and their families. In: Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics. 2018 ; Vol. 39, No. 6. pp. 471-480.
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