Effects of a self-administered health history on new-patient visits in a general medical clinic

Thomas Inui, Roy A. Jared, William B. Carter, Diane S. Plorde, Roger E. Pecoraro, Mei S. Chen, Jyl J. Dohan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Self-administered health history questionnaires (SAHHQs) are widely used in ambulatory care settings to save provider time and to assure completeness of the clinical data base. A controlled, prospective study was undertaken in a general medical clinic to evaluate the impact of an extensively pretested, highly reliable, 120-item self-administered health history questionnaire developed for new patient visits. Seventy-seven patients were randomly assigned to the SAHHQ or control groups. Time analyses were performed on audiotapes of the encounters. Patients’ charts were scored on explicit criteria for data completeness. Problem recognition was determined by comparison of pre-encounter and postencounter problem lists. SAHHQ and control visits did not differ significantly in total encounter time (44.7 versus 48.3 minutes, respectively). Less time was spent in SAHHQ encounters on data base questions (2.5 versus 3.9 minutes, p =.003). Chart data were more complete for SAHHQ patients (p

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1221-1228
Number of pages8
JournalMedical Care
Volume17
Issue number12
StatePublished - 1979
Externally publishedYes

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questionnaire
Health
history
health
Databases
Tape Recording
Ambulatory Care
Surveys and Questionnaires
Prospective Studies
Control Groups
time
Group

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Nursing(all)
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Inui, T., Jared, R. A., Carter, W. B., Plorde, D. S., Pecoraro, R. E., Chen, M. S., & Dohan, J. J. (1979). Effects of a self-administered health history on new-patient visits in a general medical clinic. Medical Care, 17(12), 1221-1228.

Effects of a self-administered health history on new-patient visits in a general medical clinic. / Inui, Thomas; Jared, Roy A.; Carter, William B.; Plorde, Diane S.; Pecoraro, Roger E.; Chen, Mei S.; Dohan, Jyl J.

In: Medical Care, Vol. 17, No. 12, 1979, p. 1221-1228.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Inui, T, Jared, RA, Carter, WB, Plorde, DS, Pecoraro, RE, Chen, MS & Dohan, JJ 1979, 'Effects of a self-administered health history on new-patient visits in a general medical clinic', Medical Care, vol. 17, no. 12, pp. 1221-1228.
Inui T, Jared RA, Carter WB, Plorde DS, Pecoraro RE, Chen MS et al. Effects of a self-administered health history on new-patient visits in a general medical clinic. Medical Care. 1979;17(12):1221-1228.
Inui, Thomas ; Jared, Roy A. ; Carter, William B. ; Plorde, Diane S. ; Pecoraro, Roger E. ; Chen, Mei S. ; Dohan, Jyl J. / Effects of a self-administered health history on new-patient visits in a general medical clinic. In: Medical Care. 1979 ; Vol. 17, No. 12. pp. 1221-1228.
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