Effects of a sodium fluoride- and phytate-containing dentifrice on remineralisation of enamel erosive lesions—an in situ randomised clinical study

Jonathan E. Creeth, Charles R. Parkinson, Gary R. Burnett, Susmita Sanyal, Frank Lippert, Domenick Zero, Anderson Hara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The objective of this work was to evaluate effects of a dentifrice containing sodium fluoride (1150 ppm F) and the organic polyphosphate phytate (0.85% w/w of the hexa-sodium salt) on in situ remineralisation of early enamel erosive lesions and resistance to subsequent demineralisation. Materials and methods: Subjects (n = 62) wore palatal appliances holding eight bovine enamel specimens with pre-formed erosive lesions. They brushed their natural teeth with the phytate test dentifrice (TD); a positive control dentifrice (PC, 1150 ppm fluoride as NaF); a reference dentifrice (RD, disodium pyrophosphate + 1100 ppm fluoride as NaF) or a negative control dentifrice (NC, fluoride-free) in a randomised, double-blind, crossover design. Specimens were removed at 2, 4 and 8 h post-brushing and exposed to an ex vivo acid challenge. Surface microhardness (Knoop) was measured at each stage. The primary efficacy variable was relative erosion resistance (RER); other variables included the surface microhardness recovery (SMHR), acid resistance ratio (ARR) and enamel fluoride uptake (EFU). Results: After 4 h, the results for RER, ARR and EFU were in the order PC > TD = RD > NC with PC > TD = RD = NC for SMHR. Results at 2 and 8 h were generally consistent with the 4 h data. Mineralisation progressed over time. Dentifrices were generally well-tolerated. Conclusions: In this in situ model, addition of phytate or pyrophosphate to a fluoride dentifrice inhibited the remineralising effect of fluoride. Both formulations still delivered fluoride to the enamel and inhibited demineralisation, albeit to a lesser extent than a polyphosphate-free dentifrice. Clinical relevance: Addition of phytate or pyrophosphate to a fluoride dentifrice may reduce its net anti-erosive properties.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalClinical Oral Investigations
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Feb 8 2018

Fingerprint

Dentifrices
Sodium Fluoride
Phytic Acid
Dental Enamel
Fluorides
Polyphosphates
Acids
Clinical Studies
Cross-Over Studies
Tooth
Salts
Sodium

Keywords

  • Demineralisation
  • Dental erosion
  • Dentifrice
  • Fluoride
  • Polyphosphate
  • Remineralisation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Effects of a sodium fluoride- and phytate-containing dentifrice on remineralisation of enamel erosive lesions—an in situ randomised clinical study. / Creeth, Jonathan E.; Parkinson, Charles R.; Burnett, Gary R.; Sanyal, Susmita; Lippert, Frank; Zero, Domenick; Hara, Anderson.

In: Clinical Oral Investigations, 08.02.2018, p. 1-10.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective: The objective of this work was to evaluate effects of a dentifrice containing sodium fluoride (1150 ppm F) and the organic polyphosphate phytate (0.85{\%} w/w of the hexa-sodium salt) on in situ remineralisation of early enamel erosive lesions and resistance to subsequent demineralisation. Materials and methods: Subjects (n = 62) wore palatal appliances holding eight bovine enamel specimens with pre-formed erosive lesions. They brushed their natural teeth with the phytate test dentifrice (TD); a positive control dentifrice (PC, 1150 ppm fluoride as NaF); a reference dentifrice (RD, disodium pyrophosphate + 1100 ppm fluoride as NaF) or a negative control dentifrice (NC, fluoride-free) in a randomised, double-blind, crossover design. Specimens were removed at 2, 4 and 8 h post-brushing and exposed to an ex vivo acid challenge. Surface microhardness (Knoop) was measured at each stage. The primary efficacy variable was relative erosion resistance (RER); other variables included the surface microhardness recovery (SMHR), acid resistance ratio (ARR) and enamel fluoride uptake (EFU). Results: After 4 h, the results for RER, ARR and EFU were in the order PC > TD = RD > NC with PC > TD = RD = NC for SMHR. Results at 2 and 8 h were generally consistent with the 4 h data. Mineralisation progressed over time. Dentifrices were generally well-tolerated. Conclusions: In this in situ model, addition of phytate or pyrophosphate to a fluoride dentifrice inhibited the remineralising effect of fluoride. Both formulations still delivered fluoride to the enamel and inhibited demineralisation, albeit to a lesser extent than a polyphosphate-free dentifrice. Clinical relevance: Addition of phytate or pyrophosphate to a fluoride dentifrice may reduce its net anti-erosive properties.",
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AU - Creeth, Jonathan E.

AU - Parkinson, Charles R.

AU - Burnett, Gary R.

AU - Sanyal, Susmita

AU - Lippert, Frank

AU - Zero, Domenick

AU - Hara, Anderson

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N2 - Objective: The objective of this work was to evaluate effects of a dentifrice containing sodium fluoride (1150 ppm F) and the organic polyphosphate phytate (0.85% w/w of the hexa-sodium salt) on in situ remineralisation of early enamel erosive lesions and resistance to subsequent demineralisation. Materials and methods: Subjects (n = 62) wore palatal appliances holding eight bovine enamel specimens with pre-formed erosive lesions. They brushed their natural teeth with the phytate test dentifrice (TD); a positive control dentifrice (PC, 1150 ppm fluoride as NaF); a reference dentifrice (RD, disodium pyrophosphate + 1100 ppm fluoride as NaF) or a negative control dentifrice (NC, fluoride-free) in a randomised, double-blind, crossover design. Specimens were removed at 2, 4 and 8 h post-brushing and exposed to an ex vivo acid challenge. Surface microhardness (Knoop) was measured at each stage. The primary efficacy variable was relative erosion resistance (RER); other variables included the surface microhardness recovery (SMHR), acid resistance ratio (ARR) and enamel fluoride uptake (EFU). Results: After 4 h, the results for RER, ARR and EFU were in the order PC > TD = RD > NC with PC > TD = RD = NC for SMHR. Results at 2 and 8 h were generally consistent with the 4 h data. Mineralisation progressed over time. Dentifrices were generally well-tolerated. Conclusions: In this in situ model, addition of phytate or pyrophosphate to a fluoride dentifrice inhibited the remineralising effect of fluoride. Both formulations still delivered fluoride to the enamel and inhibited demineralisation, albeit to a lesser extent than a polyphosphate-free dentifrice. Clinical relevance: Addition of phytate or pyrophosphate to a fluoride dentifrice may reduce its net anti-erosive properties.

AB - Objective: The objective of this work was to evaluate effects of a dentifrice containing sodium fluoride (1150 ppm F) and the organic polyphosphate phytate (0.85% w/w of the hexa-sodium salt) on in situ remineralisation of early enamel erosive lesions and resistance to subsequent demineralisation. Materials and methods: Subjects (n = 62) wore palatal appliances holding eight bovine enamel specimens with pre-formed erosive lesions. They brushed their natural teeth with the phytate test dentifrice (TD); a positive control dentifrice (PC, 1150 ppm fluoride as NaF); a reference dentifrice (RD, disodium pyrophosphate + 1100 ppm fluoride as NaF) or a negative control dentifrice (NC, fluoride-free) in a randomised, double-blind, crossover design. Specimens were removed at 2, 4 and 8 h post-brushing and exposed to an ex vivo acid challenge. Surface microhardness (Knoop) was measured at each stage. The primary efficacy variable was relative erosion resistance (RER); other variables included the surface microhardness recovery (SMHR), acid resistance ratio (ARR) and enamel fluoride uptake (EFU). Results: After 4 h, the results for RER, ARR and EFU were in the order PC > TD = RD > NC with PC > TD = RD = NC for SMHR. Results at 2 and 8 h were generally consistent with the 4 h data. Mineralisation progressed over time. Dentifrices were generally well-tolerated. Conclusions: In this in situ model, addition of phytate or pyrophosphate to a fluoride dentifrice inhibited the remineralising effect of fluoride. Both formulations still delivered fluoride to the enamel and inhibited demineralisation, albeit to a lesser extent than a polyphosphate-free dentifrice. Clinical relevance: Addition of phytate or pyrophosphate to a fluoride dentifrice may reduce its net anti-erosive properties.

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KW - Dental erosion

KW - Dentifrice

KW - Fluoride

KW - Polyphosphate

KW - Remineralisation

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