Effects of age, education, and gender on CERAD neuropsychological test performance in an African American sample

Frederick W. Unverzagt, Kathleen S. Hall, Alexia M. Torke, Jeff D. Rediger, Nenette Mercado, Oye Gureje, Benjamin O. Osuntokun, Hugh C. Hendrie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

86 Scopus citations

Abstract

Eighty-three normal, healthy, African American men and women aged 65 and older completed the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease-Neuropsychological Battery (CERAD-NB). Regression analyses indicated powerful education and less marked age and gender influences on CERAD-NB test performance. Higher education was associated with better performance on nearly all CERAD-NB tests, age effects were noted only on the memory indices (younger subjects had better scores), and women performed slightly better than men on one index from the Word List Learning Test. Age and education interacted on the Word List Learning Test such that the best scores were obtained by younger subjects with more years of schooling; the other age-education combinations did not differ from each other. Factor analysis revealed a two-factor solution (i.e., a nonmemory general cognitive factor and a verbal memory factor) which accounted for 67% of the variance. Education-stratified normative data are presented for each of the CERAD-NB tests.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)180-190
Number of pages11
JournalClinical Neuropsychologist
Volume10
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jun 5 1996

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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