Effects of age on serial recall of natural and synthetic speech

L. E. Humes, K. J. Nelson, David Pisoni, S. E. Lively

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study addressed the effects of aging on auditory serial- recall performance for natural and synthetic words. Word difficulty, measured in terms of frequency of occurrence and phonological similarity, and rate of presentation were also manipulated in an effort to determine which processes underlying serial-recall performance, if any, were affected by aging. Results indicated that age per se had little effect on short-term (working) memory as measured by the serial recall of monosyllabic words. Rate of presentation had little effect on recall for either subject group. Word difficulty, on the other hand, affected recall for both groups, with easy words being more readily recalled than hard words.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)634-639
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Speech and Hearing Research
Volume36
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1993

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Short-Term Memory
performance
Group
Serial Recall

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Effects of age on serial recall of natural and synthetic speech. / Humes, L. E.; Nelson, K. J.; Pisoni, David; Lively, S. E.

In: Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, Vol. 36, No. 3, 1993, p. 634-639.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Humes, LE, Nelson, KJ, Pisoni, D & Lively, SE 1993, 'Effects of age on serial recall of natural and synthetic speech', Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, vol. 36, no. 3, pp. 634-639.
Humes, L. E. ; Nelson, K. J. ; Pisoni, David ; Lively, S. E. / Effects of age on serial recall of natural and synthetic speech. In: Journal of Speech and Hearing Research. 1993 ; Vol. 36, No. 3. pp. 634-639.
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