Effects of cigarette smoke condensate on oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

Eman Allam, Weiping Zhang, Nouf Al-Shibani, Jun Sun, Nawaf Labban, Fengyu Song, L. Windsor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Epidemiological studies have reported that tobacco use is a major etiological factor for oral cancer. Several matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been shown to play important roles in the invasion and metastasis of oral squamous cell carcinomas, especially MMP-2 and MMP-9. This study examined the effects of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) on oral cancer cells. Design: Two oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines, SCC-25 (metastatic) and CAL-27 (non-metastatic), were exposed to different concentrations of CSC and examined for their collagen degrading ability and MMP production using collagen degradation assays, zymograms and Western blots. Results: Exposure to CSC increased the collagen degrading ability of the metastasizing cell line (SCC-25) by a mechanism involving increased MMP-2 and MMP-9 production. Conclusion: CSC increased the collagen degrading ability of SCC-25 by increasing the MMP-2 and MMP-9 protein levels. Continued cigarette smoking in oral cancer patients may result in decreased survival rates due to enhanced metastatic potential of the cancer cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1154-1161
Number of pages8
JournalArchives of Oral Biology
Volume56
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2011

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Smoke
Tobacco Products
Aptitude
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Mouth Neoplasms
Matrix Metalloproteinase 2
Matrix Metalloproteinase 9
Collagen
Matrix Metalloproteinases
Cell Line
Tobacco Use
Epidemiologic Studies
Survival Rate
Western Blotting
Smoking
Neoplasm Metastasis
Neoplasms
Proteins

Keywords

  • Cigarette smoke condensate
  • Matrix metalloproteinases
  • Oral cancer cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Cell Biology
  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Effects of cigarette smoke condensate on oral squamous cell carcinoma cells. / Allam, Eman; Zhang, Weiping; Al-Shibani, Nouf; Sun, Jun; Labban, Nawaf; Song, Fengyu; Windsor, L.

In: Archives of Oral Biology, Vol. 56, No. 10, 10.2011, p. 1154-1161.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Allam, Eman ; Zhang, Weiping ; Al-Shibani, Nouf ; Sun, Jun ; Labban, Nawaf ; Song, Fengyu ; Windsor, L. / Effects of cigarette smoke condensate on oral squamous cell carcinoma cells. In: Archives of Oral Biology. 2011 ; Vol. 56, No. 10. pp. 1154-1161.
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