Effects of cigarette smoke condensate on oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

Eman Allam, Weiping Zhang, Nouf Al-Shibani, Jun Sun, Nawaf Labban, Fengyu Song, L. Jack Windsor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Epidemiological studies have reported that tobacco use is a major etiological factor for oral cancer. Several matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been shown to play important roles in the invasion and metastasis of oral squamous cell carcinomas, especially MMP-2 and MMP-9. This study examined the effects of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) on oral cancer cells. Design: Two oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines, SCC-25 (metastatic) and CAL-27 (non-metastatic), were exposed to different concentrations of CSC and examined for their collagen degrading ability and MMP production using collagen degradation assays, zymograms and Western blots. Results: Exposure to CSC increased the collagen degrading ability of the metastasizing cell line (SCC-25) by a mechanism involving increased MMP-2 and MMP-9 production. Conclusion: CSC increased the collagen degrading ability of SCC-25 by increasing the MMP-2 and MMP-9 protein levels. Continued cigarette smoking in oral cancer patients may result in decreased survival rates due to enhanced metastatic potential of the cancer cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1154-1161
Number of pages8
JournalArchives of Oral Biology
Volume56
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2011

Keywords

  • Cigarette smoke condensate
  • Matrix metalloproteinases
  • Oral cancer cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Dentistry(all)
  • Cell Biology

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