Effects of dietary protein and fiber at breakfast on appetite, ad Libitum energy intake at lunch, and neural responses to visual food stimuli in overweight adults

R. Drew Sayer, Akua F. Amankwaah, Gregory G. Tamer, Ningning Chen, Amy J. Wright, Jason R. Tregellas, Marc Andre Cornier, David A. Kareken, Thomas M. Talavage, Megan A. McCrory, Wayne W. Campbell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Increasing either protein or fiber at mealtimes has relatively modest effects on ingestive behavior. Whether protein and fiber have additive or interactive effects on ingestive behavior is not known. Fifteen overweight adults (5 female, 10 male; BMI: 27.1 ± 0.2 kg/m2; aged 26 ± 1 year) consumed four breakfast meals in a randomized crossover manner (normal protein (12 g) + normal fiber (2 g), normal protein (12 g) + high fiber (8 g), high protein (25 g) + normal fiber (2 g), high protein (25 g) + high fiber (8 g)). The amount of protein and fiber consumed at breakfast did not influence postprandial appetite or ad libitum energy intake at lunch. In the fasting-state, visual food stimuli elicited significant responses in the bilateral insula and amygdala and left orbitofrontal cortex. Contrary to our hypotheses, postprandial right insula responses were lower after consuming normal protein vs. high protein breakfasts. Postprandial responses in other a priori brain regions were not significantly influenced by protein or fiber intake at breakfast. In conclusion, these data do not support increasing dietary protein and fiber at breakfast as effective strategies for modulating neural reward processing and acute ingestive behavior in overweight adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalNutrients
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 5 2015

Keywords

  • Appetite regulation
  • Dietary fiber
  • Dietary protein
  • FMRI
  • Food reward
  • Overweight

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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