Effects of epilepsy on language functions: Scoping review and data mining findings

Manaswita Dutta, Laura Murray, Wendy Miller, Doyle Grovesc

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: This study involved a scoping review to identify possible gaps in the empirical description of language functioning in epilepsy in adults. With access to social network data, data mining was used to determine if individuals with epilepsy are expressing language-related concerns. Method: For the scoping review, scientific databases were explored to identify pertinent articles. Findings regarding the nature of epilepsy etiologies, patient characteristics, tested language modalities, and language measures were compiled. Data mining focused on social network databases to obtain a set of relevant language-related posts. Results: The search yielded 66 articles. Epilepsy etiologies except temporal lobe epilepsy and older adults were underrepresented. Most studies utilized aphasia tests and primarily assessed single-word productions; few studies included healthy control groups. Data mining revealed several posts regarding epilepsy-related language problems, including word retrieval, reading, writing, verbal memory difficulties, and negative effects of epilepsy treatment on language. Conclusion: Our findings underscore the need for future specification of the integrity of language in epilepsy, particularly with respect to discourse and high-level language abilities. Increased awareness of epilepsyrelated language issues and understanding the patients’ perspectives about their language concerns will allow researchers and speech-language pathologists to utilize appropriate assessments and improve quality of care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)350-378
Number of pages29
JournalAmerican Journal of Speech-Language Pathology
Volume27
Issue number1S
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2018

Fingerprint

epilepsy
Data Mining
Epilepsy
Language
language
etiology
Social Support
social network
Databases
Aptitude
Temporal Lobe Epilepsy
Quality of Health Care
Neuropsychological Tests
speech disorder
integrity
Reading

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

Effects of epilepsy on language functions : Scoping review and data mining findings. / Dutta, Manaswita; Murray, Laura; Miller, Wendy; Grovesc, Doyle.

In: American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, Vol. 27, No. 1S, 01.03.2018, p. 350-378.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dutta, Manaswita ; Murray, Laura ; Miller, Wendy ; Grovesc, Doyle. / Effects of epilepsy on language functions : Scoping review and data mining findings. In: American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology. 2018 ; Vol. 27, No. 1S. pp. 350-378.
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