Effects of image brightness and contrast dynamic altering stimuli (DAS) when viewing video content on ocular blood flow

Brent Siesky, Alon Harris, Joshua Gross, Emma Sechrist, David Camp, Andrea Cardenas, Pooja Patel, Fawaz Hasnain, Rachel Kawiecki, Aaditya Shah, Alice C. Verticchio Vercellin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background/Aim: Blood flow deficiencies of the retinal and retrobulbar circulations have been previously reported in open-angle glaucoma (OAG) and other eye diseases. Herein we investigated the effects of image brightness and contrast dynamic altering stimuli (DAS) when viewing a video content on ocular blood flow, intraocular pressure (IOP) and ocular perfusion pressure (OPP) in OAG and healthy subjects. Methods: Thirty-five subjects, 25 with OAG (mild to moderate) and 10 healthy controls, were evaluated for blood pressure, IOP, OPP and retinal capillary blood flow before, immediately after, 30 min after and 60 min after using ReviView (a dichoptic video goggles device), which stimulates one eye with a DAS video image that is brighter and with greater contrast than the fellow eye (duration of exposure 30 min). Differences between each subject's eyes and between OAG and healthy subjects were evaluated using repeated-measures analysis of variance with p<0.05 considered statistically significant. Results: All subjects demonstrated a significant increase in OPP in both eyes immediately following viewing. In all DAS eyes, retinal capillary blood flow rose immediately after stimulation and remained elevated for an hour postviewing. Viewing DAS increased retinal blood flow compared with control eyes (p=0.0014, 0.0135 superiorly and p=0.0094, 0.0001 inferiorly, at 30 and 60 min, respectively). OAG eyes had a significant reduction in the number of dormant retinal capillaries (p=0.0174), while healthy eyes demonstrated a larger increase in retinal capillary blood flow (p=0.0006 and p=0.0093 at 60 min, superior and inferior, respectively) following DAS viewing. Conclusion: Viewing DAS video for 30 min using ReviView increased retina blood flow both in healthy subjects and in patients with OAG. Trial registration number: NCT02959593.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalBritish Journal of Ophthalmology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

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Open Angle Glaucoma
Healthy Volunteers
Perfusion
Intraocular Pressure
Pressure
Eye Protective Devices
Eye Diseases
Retina
Analysis of Variance
Blood Pressure
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • glaucoma
  • imaging
  • vision

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Effects of image brightness and contrast dynamic altering stimuli (DAS) when viewing video content on ocular blood flow. / Siesky, Brent; Harris, Alon; Gross, Joshua; Sechrist, Emma; Camp, David; Cardenas, Andrea; Patel, Pooja; Hasnain, Fawaz; Kawiecki, Rachel; Shah, Aaditya; Verticchio Vercellin, Alice C.

In: British Journal of Ophthalmology, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Siesky, Brent ; Harris, Alon ; Gross, Joshua ; Sechrist, Emma ; Camp, David ; Cardenas, Andrea ; Patel, Pooja ; Hasnain, Fawaz ; Kawiecki, Rachel ; Shah, Aaditya ; Verticchio Vercellin, Alice C. / Effects of image brightness and contrast dynamic altering stimuli (DAS) when viewing video content on ocular blood flow. In: British Journal of Ophthalmology. 2018.
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AU - Siesky, Brent

AU - Harris, Alon

AU - Gross, Joshua

AU - Sechrist, Emma

AU - Camp, David

AU - Cardenas, Andrea

AU - Patel, Pooja

AU - Hasnain, Fawaz

AU - Kawiecki, Rachel

AU - Shah, Aaditya

AU - Verticchio Vercellin, Alice C.

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AB - Background/Aim: Blood flow deficiencies of the retinal and retrobulbar circulations have been previously reported in open-angle glaucoma (OAG) and other eye diseases. Herein we investigated the effects of image brightness and contrast dynamic altering stimuli (DAS) when viewing a video content on ocular blood flow, intraocular pressure (IOP) and ocular perfusion pressure (OPP) in OAG and healthy subjects. Methods: Thirty-five subjects, 25 with OAG (mild to moderate) and 10 healthy controls, were evaluated for blood pressure, IOP, OPP and retinal capillary blood flow before, immediately after, 30 min after and 60 min after using ReviView (a dichoptic video goggles device), which stimulates one eye with a DAS video image that is brighter and with greater contrast than the fellow eye (duration of exposure 30 min). Differences between each subject's eyes and between OAG and healthy subjects were evaluated using repeated-measures analysis of variance with p<0.05 considered statistically significant. Results: All subjects demonstrated a significant increase in OPP in both eyes immediately following viewing. In all DAS eyes, retinal capillary blood flow rose immediately after stimulation and remained elevated for an hour postviewing. Viewing DAS increased retinal blood flow compared with control eyes (p=0.0014, 0.0135 superiorly and p=0.0094, 0.0001 inferiorly, at 30 and 60 min, respectively). OAG eyes had a significant reduction in the number of dormant retinal capillaries (p=0.0174), while healthy eyes demonstrated a larger increase in retinal capillary blood flow (p=0.0006 and p=0.0093 at 60 min, superior and inferior, respectively) following DAS viewing. Conclusion: Viewing DAS video for 30 min using ReviView increased retina blood flow both in healthy subjects and in patients with OAG. Trial registration number: NCT02959593.

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