Effects of interim acrylic resins on the expression of cytokines from epithelial cells and on collagen degradation

Sary Borzangy, Nawaf Labban, L. Jack Windsor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Statement of problem Interim acrylic resins release agents that alter cytokine expression in the surrounding tissues, which could alter extracellular matrix degradation. Purpose The purpose of the study was to evaluate the responses of human epidermal keratinocytes to eluates of interim acrylic resins in regards to cytokine expression and cell-mediated collagen degradation. Material and methods Specimens of 4 different interim acrylic resins (HI-I, Jet Acrylic, SNAP acrylic, and Protemp Plus) were placed in Epilife medium for 48 hours and the eluates collected. The cells were incubated for 72 hours in nontoxic concentrations of the eluates. Cytotoxicity was evaluated with lactate dehydrogenase assays and cytokine expression with cytokine antibody arrays. Collagen degradation was determined with a collagen type I assay. The experiments were performed 3 times. Data were analyzed with 1-way and mixed-model ANOVA (α=.05). Results None of the eluates were cytotoxic. Cytokine expression from the heat-activated polymethyl methacrylate resin group was significantly less for interleukin-3, but significantly greater for interlukin-7. Expression for the chemically activated polymethyl methacrylate resin group was significantly less for growth-regulated oncogene-α, interleukin-1α, and interleukin-3. Expression for the chemically activated polyethyl methacrylate resin group was significantly less for interleukin-1α and interleukin-3, but significantly greater for interleukin-13 and monocytes chemoattractant protein-3. The cytokine expression induced by chemically activated bis-acryl composite resin was significantly greater for granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor, interleukin-7, and monocytes chemoattractant protein-3, but significantly less for growth-regulated oncogene-α. Collagen degradation was not significantly different in any of the groups. Conclusions The eluates used were not cytotoxic and did not induce cell-mediated collagen degradation. Some significant changes in cytokine expression were noted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)296-302
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Prosthetic Dentistry
Volume110
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oral Surgery

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