Effects of physical training on proprioception in older women

K. R. Thompson, Alan E. Mikesky, R. E. Bahamonde, David Burr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Older adulthood is accompanied by declines in muscular strength, coordination, function, and increased risk of falling. Resistance training increases muscular strength in this population but its effect on proprioception is unknown. To evaluate the effect of resistance training on proprioception, community dwelling older women completed a three-month exercise study. A resistance training (RT) group (N=19) underwent supervised weight training three times per week while a non-strength trained control (NSTC) group (N=19) performed range-of-motion activities that mimicked the movements of the RT group without the benefit of muscle loading. Subjects were evaluated at baseline, 6, and 12 weeks for strength and proprioception. Muscular strength was assessed by measuring the subject's one repetition maximum performance on four different exercises. Static proprioception was measured by the subject's ability to reproduce a target knee joint angle while dynamic proprioception was measured by the subject's ability to detect passive knee motion. The RT group made significant strength improvements compared to the NSTC group. Proprioception significantly improved in both groups by 6 weeks. Our findings suggest that improvements in proprioception can be obtained via regular activity that is independent of heavy muscle loading.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)223-231
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Musculoskeletal Neuronal Interactions
Volume3
Issue number3
StatePublished - Sep 2003

Fingerprint

Proprioception
Resistance Training
Aptitude
Accidental Falls
Exercise
Independent Living
Muscles
Control Groups
Knee Joint
Articular Range of Motion
Knee
Weights and Measures
Population

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Elderly
  • Kinesthetic
  • Strength
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Thompson, K. R., Mikesky, A. E., Bahamonde, R. E., & Burr, D. (2003). Effects of physical training on proprioception in older women. Journal of Musculoskeletal Neuronal Interactions, 3(3), 223-231.

Effects of physical training on proprioception in older women. / Thompson, K. R.; Mikesky, Alan E.; Bahamonde, R. E.; Burr, David.

In: Journal of Musculoskeletal Neuronal Interactions, Vol. 3, No. 3, 09.2003, p. 223-231.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Thompson, KR, Mikesky, AE, Bahamonde, RE & Burr, D 2003, 'Effects of physical training on proprioception in older women', Journal of Musculoskeletal Neuronal Interactions, vol. 3, no. 3, pp. 223-231.
Thompson KR, Mikesky AE, Bahamonde RE, Burr D. Effects of physical training on proprioception in older women. Journal of Musculoskeletal Neuronal Interactions. 2003 Sep;3(3):223-231.
Thompson, K. R. ; Mikesky, Alan E. ; Bahamonde, R. E. ; Burr, David. / Effects of physical training on proprioception in older women. In: Journal of Musculoskeletal Neuronal Interactions. 2003 ; Vol. 3, No. 3. pp. 223-231.
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