Effects of provisional acrylic resins on gingival fibroblast cytokine/growth factor expression

Nawaf Labban, Fengyu Song, Nouf Al-Shibani, L. Jack Windsor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Statement of problem: Several studies have reported that polymerized resin materials may release agents into surrounding tissues. These agents could alter cytokine/growth factor expression. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects that provisional acrylic resins have on cell toxicity and the expression of cytokines/growth factors from human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs). Material and methods: The materials used in this study were chemically activated bis-acryl composite (Chem-Bis), chemically activated polyethyl methacrylate (Chem-PEMA), chemically activated polymethyl methacrylate (Chem-PMMA), and heat-activated polymethyl methacrylate (Heat-PMMA) resins. HGFs were incubated for 72 hours in the presence of eluate from each resin and in the absence of any eluate (negative control). The conditioned media were then collected and stored at -70°C. Cell toxicity was determined using a lactate dehydrogenase method. Cytokine/growth factor expression was examined using cytokine antibody arrays. The experiments were repeated 3 times. The data were analyzed with 1-way ANOVA, Mann-Whitney test, and 1-sample t test (α=.05). Results: There was no significant cell toxicity observed from the eluates. The cytokine/growth factor expression induced by Chem-Bis was significantly greater than the control for growth-regulated oncogene (GRO) (P<.001), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) (P=.031), and tumor necrosis factor-β (TNF)-β (P=.009). For Chem-PEMA, the cytokine/growth factor expression was significantly greater than the control for GRO-α (P=.022), interleukin (IL)-13 (P=.031), and TNF-α (P=.017). The cytokines/growth factors induced by Chem-PEMA were significantly less than the control (P=.008) and Chem-Bis for IL-8 (P=.042). The expression induced by Chem-PMMA was significantly greater than the control for IL-13 (P=.036), IL-1α (P=.003), IL-2 (P=.020), and IL-5 (P=.045). Finally, Heat-PMMA induced significantly greater levels than the control for GRO (P<.001) and IL-13 (P=.008). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that the resins evaluated were nontoxic to the HGFs. There were changes in the cytokine/growth factor levels that were statistically significant, but may not be clinically significant. (J Prosthet Dent 2008;100:390-397).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)390-397
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Prosthetic Dentistry
Volume100
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2008

Fingerprint

Acrylic Resins
Fibroblast Growth Factors
Cytokines
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Polymethyl Methacrylate
Fibroblasts
Methacrylates
Conditioned Culture Medium
Oncogenes
L-Lactate Dehydrogenase
Analysis of Variance
Hot Temperature
Antibodies
Growth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oral Surgery

Cite this

Effects of provisional acrylic resins on gingival fibroblast cytokine/growth factor expression. / Labban, Nawaf; Song, Fengyu; Al-Shibani, Nouf; Windsor, L. Jack.

In: Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry, Vol. 100, No. 5, 01.11.2008, p. 390-397.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{a47bb16a54be42b0bddae7bebb000463,
title = "Effects of provisional acrylic resins on gingival fibroblast cytokine/growth factor expression",
abstract = "Statement of problem: Several studies have reported that polymerized resin materials may release agents into surrounding tissues. These agents could alter cytokine/growth factor expression. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects that provisional acrylic resins have on cell toxicity and the expression of cytokines/growth factors from human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs). Material and methods: The materials used in this study were chemically activated bis-acryl composite (Chem-Bis), chemically activated polyethyl methacrylate (Chem-PEMA), chemically activated polymethyl methacrylate (Chem-PMMA), and heat-activated polymethyl methacrylate (Heat-PMMA) resins. HGFs were incubated for 72 hours in the presence of eluate from each resin and in the absence of any eluate (negative control). The conditioned media were then collected and stored at -70°C. Cell toxicity was determined using a lactate dehydrogenase method. Cytokine/growth factor expression was examined using cytokine antibody arrays. The experiments were repeated 3 times. The data were analyzed with 1-way ANOVA, Mann-Whitney test, and 1-sample t test (α=.05). Results: There was no significant cell toxicity observed from the eluates. The cytokine/growth factor expression induced by Chem-Bis was significantly greater than the control for growth-regulated oncogene (GRO) (P<.001), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) (P=.031), and tumor necrosis factor-β (TNF)-β (P=.009). For Chem-PEMA, the cytokine/growth factor expression was significantly greater than the control for GRO-α (P=.022), interleukin (IL)-13 (P=.031), and TNF-α (P=.017). The cytokines/growth factors induced by Chem-PEMA were significantly less than the control (P=.008) and Chem-Bis for IL-8 (P=.042). The expression induced by Chem-PMMA was significantly greater than the control for IL-13 (P=.036), IL-1α (P=.003), IL-2 (P=.020), and IL-5 (P=.045). Finally, Heat-PMMA induced significantly greater levels than the control for GRO (P<.001) and IL-13 (P=.008). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that the resins evaluated were nontoxic to the HGFs. There were changes in the cytokine/growth factor levels that were statistically significant, but may not be clinically significant. (J Prosthet Dent 2008;100:390-397).",
author = "Nawaf Labban and Fengyu Song and Nouf Al-Shibani and Windsor, {L. Jack}",
year = "2008",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/S0022-3913(08)60242-5",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "100",
pages = "390--397",
journal = "Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry",
issn = "0022-3913",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of provisional acrylic resins on gingival fibroblast cytokine/growth factor expression

AU - Labban, Nawaf

AU - Song, Fengyu

AU - Al-Shibani, Nouf

AU - Windsor, L. Jack

PY - 2008/11/1

Y1 - 2008/11/1

N2 - Statement of problem: Several studies have reported that polymerized resin materials may release agents into surrounding tissues. These agents could alter cytokine/growth factor expression. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects that provisional acrylic resins have on cell toxicity and the expression of cytokines/growth factors from human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs). Material and methods: The materials used in this study were chemically activated bis-acryl composite (Chem-Bis), chemically activated polyethyl methacrylate (Chem-PEMA), chemically activated polymethyl methacrylate (Chem-PMMA), and heat-activated polymethyl methacrylate (Heat-PMMA) resins. HGFs were incubated for 72 hours in the presence of eluate from each resin and in the absence of any eluate (negative control). The conditioned media were then collected and stored at -70°C. Cell toxicity was determined using a lactate dehydrogenase method. Cytokine/growth factor expression was examined using cytokine antibody arrays. The experiments were repeated 3 times. The data were analyzed with 1-way ANOVA, Mann-Whitney test, and 1-sample t test (α=.05). Results: There was no significant cell toxicity observed from the eluates. The cytokine/growth factor expression induced by Chem-Bis was significantly greater than the control for growth-regulated oncogene (GRO) (P<.001), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) (P=.031), and tumor necrosis factor-β (TNF)-β (P=.009). For Chem-PEMA, the cytokine/growth factor expression was significantly greater than the control for GRO-α (P=.022), interleukin (IL)-13 (P=.031), and TNF-α (P=.017). The cytokines/growth factors induced by Chem-PEMA were significantly less than the control (P=.008) and Chem-Bis for IL-8 (P=.042). The expression induced by Chem-PMMA was significantly greater than the control for IL-13 (P=.036), IL-1α (P=.003), IL-2 (P=.020), and IL-5 (P=.045). Finally, Heat-PMMA induced significantly greater levels than the control for GRO (P<.001) and IL-13 (P=.008). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that the resins evaluated were nontoxic to the HGFs. There were changes in the cytokine/growth factor levels that were statistically significant, but may not be clinically significant. (J Prosthet Dent 2008;100:390-397).

AB - Statement of problem: Several studies have reported that polymerized resin materials may release agents into surrounding tissues. These agents could alter cytokine/growth factor expression. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects that provisional acrylic resins have on cell toxicity and the expression of cytokines/growth factors from human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs). Material and methods: The materials used in this study were chemically activated bis-acryl composite (Chem-Bis), chemically activated polyethyl methacrylate (Chem-PEMA), chemically activated polymethyl methacrylate (Chem-PMMA), and heat-activated polymethyl methacrylate (Heat-PMMA) resins. HGFs were incubated for 72 hours in the presence of eluate from each resin and in the absence of any eluate (negative control). The conditioned media were then collected and stored at -70°C. Cell toxicity was determined using a lactate dehydrogenase method. Cytokine/growth factor expression was examined using cytokine antibody arrays. The experiments were repeated 3 times. The data were analyzed with 1-way ANOVA, Mann-Whitney test, and 1-sample t test (α=.05). Results: There was no significant cell toxicity observed from the eluates. The cytokine/growth factor expression induced by Chem-Bis was significantly greater than the control for growth-regulated oncogene (GRO) (P<.001), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) (P=.031), and tumor necrosis factor-β (TNF)-β (P=.009). For Chem-PEMA, the cytokine/growth factor expression was significantly greater than the control for GRO-α (P=.022), interleukin (IL)-13 (P=.031), and TNF-α (P=.017). The cytokines/growth factors induced by Chem-PEMA were significantly less than the control (P=.008) and Chem-Bis for IL-8 (P=.042). The expression induced by Chem-PMMA was significantly greater than the control for IL-13 (P=.036), IL-1α (P=.003), IL-2 (P=.020), and IL-5 (P=.045). Finally, Heat-PMMA induced significantly greater levels than the control for GRO (P<.001) and IL-13 (P=.008). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that the resins evaluated were nontoxic to the HGFs. There were changes in the cytokine/growth factor levels that were statistically significant, but may not be clinically significant. (J Prosthet Dent 2008;100:390-397).

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=55049134156&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=55049134156&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0022-3913(08)60242-5

DO - 10.1016/S0022-3913(08)60242-5

M3 - Article

C2 - 18992573

AN - SCOPUS:55049134156

VL - 100

SP - 390

EP - 397

JO - Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry

JF - Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry

SN - 0022-3913

IS - 5

ER -