Effects of Quercetin on antioxidant defense in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

Ruth A. Sanders, Frederick M. Rauscher, John B. Watkins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

114 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In light of evidence that some complications of diabetes mellitus may be caused or exacerbated by oxidative damage, we investigated the effects of subacute treatment with the antioxidant quercetin on tissue antioxidant defense systems in streptozotocin-induced diabetic Sprague-Dawley rats (30 days after streptozotocin induction). Quercetin, 2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-3,5,7-trihydroxy-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one, was administered at a dose of 10mg/kg/day, ip for 14 days, after which liver, kidney, brain, and heart were assayed for degree of lipid peroxidation, reduced and oxidized glutathione content, and activities of the free-radical detoxifying enzymes catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase. Treatment of normal rats with quercetin increased serum AST and increased hepatic concentration of oxidized glutathione. All tissues from diabetic animals exhibited disturbances in antioxidant defense when compared with normal controls. Quercetin treatment of diabetic rats reversed only the diabetic effects on brain oxidized glutathione concentration and on hepatic glutathione peroxidase activity. By contrast, a 20% increase in hepatic lipid peroxidation, a 40% decline in hepatic glutathione concentration, an increase in renal (23%) and cardiac (40%) glutathione peroxidase activities, and a 65% increase in cardiac catalase activity reflect intensified diabetic effects after treatment with quercetin. These results call into question the ability of therapy with the antioxidant quercetin to reverse diabetic oxidative stress in an overall sense.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)143-149
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Biochemical and Molecular Toxicology
Volume15
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

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Quercetin
Streptozocin
Rats
Antioxidants
Glutathione Disulfide
Glutathione Peroxidase
Liver
Catalase
Lipid Peroxidation
Glutathione
Brain
Tissue
Kidney
Lipids
Oxidative stress
Glutathione Reductase
Diabetes Complications
Medical problems
Superoxide Dismutase
Free Radicals

Keywords

  • Brain
  • Diabetes
  • Flavonoids
  • Heart
  • Kidney
  • Liver
  • Oxidative stress
  • Quercetin
  • Reactive oxygen species

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Biochemistry
  • Toxicology
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Effects of Quercetin on antioxidant defense in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. / Sanders, Ruth A.; Rauscher, Frederick M.; Watkins, John B.

In: Journal of Biochemical and Molecular Toxicology, Vol. 15, No. 3, 2001, p. 143-149.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sanders, Ruth A. ; Rauscher, Frederick M. ; Watkins, John B. / Effects of Quercetin on antioxidant defense in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. In: Journal of Biochemical and Molecular Toxicology. 2001 ; Vol. 15, No. 3. pp. 143-149.
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