Effects of self-esteem, optimism, and perceived control on depressive symptoms in stroke survivor-spouse dyads

Misook L. Chung, Tamilyn Bakas, Laura D. Plue, Linda Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Depressive symptoms are common in stroke survivors and their family caregivers. Given the interdependent relationship between the members of dyads in poststroke management, improving depressive symptoms in dyads may depend on their partner's characteristics. Self-esteem, optimism, and perceived control, all known to be associated with depressive symptoms in an individual, may also contribute to their partner's depressive symptoms. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine actor and partner effects of self-esteem, optimism, and perceived control on depression in stroke survivors and their spousal caregivers. Methods: A total of 112 ischemic stroke survivors (78% white, 34%women; mean age, 62.5 T 12.3 years) and their spouses (mean age, 60.6 T 12.9 years) completed surveys in which depressive symptoms, self-esteem, optimism, and perceived control were assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire, the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale, the Revised Life Orientation Test, and the Sense of Control Scale. Multilevel modeling, actor-partner interdependence model regression was used to determine influences on depressive symptoms within the dyad. Results: Individuals with lower self-esteem, optimism, and perceived control had higher levels of depressive symptoms. Stroke survivors whose spouses had lower levels of self-esteem (B = j0.338, P G .001) and optimism (B = j0.361, P G .027) tended to have higher levels of depressive symptoms. Spouses whose stroke survivors had lower levels of self-esteem (B = j0.047, P = .036) also had higher levels of depressive symptoms. Conclusion: We found significant partner effects of self-esteem on depression for both members and partner effect of optimism on patient's depressive symptoms. These findings suggest that further research is needed to determine if dyadic interventions may help to improve self-esteem, optimism, and depressive symptoms in both patients and their caregivers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)E8-E16
JournalJournal of Cardiovascular Nursing
Volume31
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

Fingerprint

Spouses
Self Concept
Survivors
Stroke
Depression
Caregivers
Optimism

Keywords

  • depression
  • Family study
  • Stroke management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Effects of self-esteem, optimism, and perceived control on depressive symptoms in stroke survivor-spouse dyads. / Chung, Misook L.; Bakas, Tamilyn; Plue, Laura D.; Williams, Linda.

In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, Vol. 31, No. 2, 2016, p. E8-E16.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: Depressive symptoms are common in stroke survivors and their family caregivers. Given the interdependent relationship between the members of dyads in poststroke management, improving depressive symptoms in dyads may depend on their partner's characteristics. Self-esteem, optimism, and perceived control, all known to be associated with depressive symptoms in an individual, may also contribute to their partner's depressive symptoms. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine actor and partner effects of self-esteem, optimism, and perceived control on depression in stroke survivors and their spousal caregivers. Methods: A total of 112 ischemic stroke survivors (78{\%} white, 34{\%}women; mean age, 62.5 T 12.3 years) and their spouses (mean age, 60.6 T 12.9 years) completed surveys in which depressive symptoms, self-esteem, optimism, and perceived control were assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire, the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale, the Revised Life Orientation Test, and the Sense of Control Scale. Multilevel modeling, actor-partner interdependence model regression was used to determine influences on depressive symptoms within the dyad. Results: Individuals with lower self-esteem, optimism, and perceived control had higher levels of depressive symptoms. Stroke survivors whose spouses had lower levels of self-esteem (B = j0.338, P G .001) and optimism (B = j0.361, P G .027) tended to have higher levels of depressive symptoms. Spouses whose stroke survivors had lower levels of self-esteem (B = j0.047, P = .036) also had higher levels of depressive symptoms. Conclusion: We found significant partner effects of self-esteem on depression for both members and partner effect of optimism on patient's depressive symptoms. These findings suggest that further research is needed to determine if dyadic interventions may help to improve self-esteem, optimism, and depressive symptoms in both patients and their caregivers.",
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