Effects of Semantic Context and Feedback on Perceptual Learning of Speech Processed Through an Acoustic Simulation of a Cochlear Implant

Jeremy L. Loebach, David Pisoni, Mario A. Svirsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effect of feedback and materials on perceptual learning was examined in listeners with normal hearing who were exposed to cochlear implant simulations. Generalization was most robust when feedback paired the spectrally degraded sentences with their written transcriptions, promoting mapping between the degraded signal and its acoustic-phonetic representation. Transfer-appropriate processing theory suggests that such feedback was most successful because the original learning conditions were reinstated at testing: Performance was facilitated when both training and testing contained degraded stimuli. In addition, the effect of semantic context on generalization was assessed by training listeners on meaningful or anomalous sentences. Training with anomalous sentences was as effective as that with meaningful sentences, suggesting that listeners were encouraged to use acoustic-phonetic information to identify speech than to make predictions from semantic context.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)224-234
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance
Volume36
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2010

Fingerprint

Cochlear Implants
Semantics
Acoustics
Phonetics
Learning
Hearing
Listeners
Perceptual Learning
Simulation
Semantic Context
Cochlear Implant
Acoustic Phonetics
Testing

Keywords

  • acoustic simulations
  • cochlear implants
  • deafness
  • perceptual learning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

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