Effects of speed on forelimb joint angular displacement patterns in vervet monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops)

Joel Vilensky, E. Gankiewicz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Shoulder, elbow and wrist joint angular displacement patterns were analyzed for five vervet monkeys across increasing speed. Within symmetrical gaits, the peak positions of the pattern for each joint tended to decrease with increasing speed as did the yield angle of the elbow (more ''yielding''). Across the walk(run)-gallop transition there were no notable changes in the displacement patterns, but there was a consistent decrease in the range of elbow movements and an increase in the yield angle. Across asymmetrical gaits, there was also a tendency for some of the peak positions to decrease. These results are compared with those available for cats and dogs, and are interpreted relative to functional and neurological aspects of forelimb movements in primates.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)203-210
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Physical Anthropology
Volume83
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1990

Fingerprint

Cercopithecus aethiops
Forelimb
elbows
Elbow
forelimbs
Gait
Joints
gait
Wrist Joint
Elbow Joint
Shoulder Joint
Primates
Cats
Dogs
shoulders
joints (animal)
cats
dogs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Anthropology

Cite this

Effects of speed on forelimb joint angular displacement patterns in vervet monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops). / Vilensky, Joel; Gankiewicz, E.

In: American Journal of Physical Anthropology, Vol. 83, No. 2, 1990, p. 203-210.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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