Effects of virally expressed interleukin-10 on vaccinia virus infection in mice

Michael G. Kurilla, Sankar Swaminathan, Raymond M. Welsh, Elliott Kieff, Randy Brutkiewicz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To investigate the in vivo role of interleukin-10 (IL-10) in viral infection, we compared infections with a recombinant vaccinia virus (VV) expressing IL-10 (VV-IL10) under control of the VV P7.5 promoter and a control virus (VV-βgal) in normal and severe combined immunodeficient mice. In normal mice, VV-IL10 infection resulted in less natural killer cell activity at 3 days postinfection and less VV-specific cytotoxic T-cell activity at 6 or 7 days postinfection than VV-βgal infection. However, the use of dermal scarification or intraperitoneal, intranasal, or intracerebral inoculation into immunocompetent mice resulted in no difference between VV-IL10 and VV-βgal in visible lesions, mortality, protective immunity to a 100-fold lethal VV challenge, or VV-specific antibody response. In the immunodeficient mice, VV-IL10 infection resulted in greater natural killer cell activity and lower virus replication than VV-βgal infection. These in vivo effects were subtler and more complex than had been anticipated. From the VV-IL10 murine model, the Epstein-Barr virus-encoded homolog of human IL-10, BCRF1, may provide a selective advantage by blunting the early human natural killer cell and cytotoxic T-cell responses so that Epstein-Barr virus can establish a well-contained latent infection in B lymphocytes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)7623-7628
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Virology
Volume67
Issue number12
StatePublished - Dec 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Vaccinia virus
Virus Diseases
interleukin-10
Interleukin-10
mice
infection
natural killer cells
Natural Killer Cells
Human herpesvirus 4
Human Herpesvirus 4
T-lymphocytes
T-Lymphocytes
SCID Mice
Virus Replication
virus replication
Infection
lesions (animal)
B-lymphocytes
Antibody Formation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Kurilla, M. G., Swaminathan, S., Welsh, R. M., Kieff, E., & Brutkiewicz, R. (1993). Effects of virally expressed interleukin-10 on vaccinia virus infection in mice. Journal of Virology, 67(12), 7623-7628.

Effects of virally expressed interleukin-10 on vaccinia virus infection in mice. / Kurilla, Michael G.; Swaminathan, Sankar; Welsh, Raymond M.; Kieff, Elliott; Brutkiewicz, Randy.

In: Journal of Virology, Vol. 67, No. 12, 12.1993, p. 7623-7628.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kurilla, MG, Swaminathan, S, Welsh, RM, Kieff, E & Brutkiewicz, R 1993, 'Effects of virally expressed interleukin-10 on vaccinia virus infection in mice', Journal of Virology, vol. 67, no. 12, pp. 7623-7628.
Kurilla MG, Swaminathan S, Welsh RM, Kieff E, Brutkiewicz R. Effects of virally expressed interleukin-10 on vaccinia virus infection in mice. Journal of Virology. 1993 Dec;67(12):7623-7628.
Kurilla, Michael G. ; Swaminathan, Sankar ; Welsh, Raymond M. ; Kieff, Elliott ; Brutkiewicz, Randy. / Effects of virally expressed interleukin-10 on vaccinia virus infection in mice. In: Journal of Virology. 1993 ; Vol. 67, No. 12. pp. 7623-7628.
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