Effects of Vitamin D supplementation on glucose and insulin homeostasis and incident diabetes among nondiabetic adults: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Huilin Tang, Deming Li, Yufeng Li, Xi Zhang, Yiqing Song, Xinli Li

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims. Emerging evidence has suggested a mechanistic link from vitamin D metabolism to glucose and insulin homeostasis. This study is aimed at specifically quantifying the direct effects of vitamin D supplementation on indexes of glucose and insulin homeostasis as well as incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) among nondiabetic adults. Methods. We systematically searched randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of vitamin D supplementation in nondiabetic adults in PubMed, EMBASE, and CENTRAL. Random-effects meta-analysis was conducted to pool the estimates. Results. Our meta-analysis included 47 RCTs involving 44,161 nondiabetic individuals with a median trial duration of 4 months and a median dose of 4000 IU/d. Vitamin D supplementation significantly reduced fasting glucose by 0.11 mmol/L, fasting insulin by 1.47 mIU/L, and HOMA-IR by 0.32 while increasing total 25 (OH) D levels by 40.14 nmol/L. We found no significant effects of vitamin D supplementation on insulin secretion or beta cell function indexes. Based on the data from six trials involving 39,633 participants and 2533 incident T2D cases, vitamin D supplementation was not associated with the risk of incident diabetes compared to placebo (pooled relative risk: 1.01, 95% confidence interval: 0.93 to 1.08). Conclusions. Our meta-analysis found that vitamin D supplementation might improve glucose and insulin metabolism without affecting the risk of T2D among nondiabetic adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number7908764
JournalInternational Journal of Endocrinology
Volume2018
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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Vitamin D
Meta-Analysis
Homeostasis
Randomized Controlled Trials
Insulin
Glucose
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Fasting
PubMed
Placebos
Confidence Intervals
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrine and Autonomic Systems

Cite this

Effects of Vitamin D supplementation on glucose and insulin homeostasis and incident diabetes among nondiabetic adults : A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. / Tang, Huilin; Li, Deming; Li, Yufeng; Zhang, Xi; Song, Yiqing; Li, Xinli.

In: International Journal of Endocrinology, Vol. 2018, 7908764, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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