Efficacy of exercise for menopausal symptoms: A randomized controlled trial

Barbara Sternfeld, Katherine A. Guthrie, Kristine E. Ensrud, Andrea Z. Lacroix, Joseph C. Larson, Andrea L. Dunn, Garnet L. Anderson, Rebecca A. Seguin, Janet Carpenter, Katherine M. Newton, Susan D. Reed, Ellen W. Freeman, Lee S. Cohen, Hadine Joffe, Melanie Roberts, Bette J. Caan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

70 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: This study aims to determine the efficacy of exercise training for alleviating vasomotor and other menopausal symptoms. METHODS: Late perimenopausal and postmenopausal sedentary women with frequent vasomotor symptoms (VMS) participated in a randomized controlled trial conducted in three sites: 106 women randomized to exercise and 142 women randomized to usual activity. The exercise intervention consisted of individual facility-based aerobic exercise training three times per week for 12 weeks. VMS frequency and bother were recorded on daily diaries at baseline and on weeks 6 and 12. Intent-to-treat analyses compared between-group differences in changes in VMS frequency and bother, sleep symptoms (Insomnia Severity Index and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), and mood (Patient Health Questionnaire-8 and Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 questionnaire). RESULTS: At the end of week 12, changes in VMS frequency in the exercise group (mean change,-2.4 VMS/d; 95% CI,-3.0 to-1.7) and VMS bother (mean change on a four-point scale,-0.5; 95% CI,-0.6 to-0.4) were not significantly different from those in the control group (-2.6 VMS/d; 95% CI,-3.2 to-2.0; P = 0.43;-0.5 points; 95% CI,-0.6 to-0.4; P = 0.75). The exercise group reported greater improvement in insomnia symptoms (P = 0.03), subjective sleep quality (P = 0.01), and depressive symptoms (P = 0.04), but differences were small and not statistically significant when P values were adjusted for multiple comparisons. Results were similar when considering treatment-adherent women only. CONCLUSIONS: These findings provide strong evidence that 12 weeks of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise do not alleviate VMS but may result in small improvements in sleep quality, insomnia, and depression in midlife sedentary women.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)330-338
Number of pages9
JournalMenopause
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Randomized Controlled Trials
Exercise
Sleep
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
Depression
Anxiety Disorders
Control Groups
Health

Keywords

  • Hot flashes
  • Insomnia symptoms
  • Intervention
  • Mood
  • Physical activity
  • Sleep quality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Sternfeld, B., Guthrie, K. A., Ensrud, K. E., Lacroix, A. Z., Larson, J. C., Dunn, A. L., ... Caan, B. J. (2014). Efficacy of exercise for menopausal symptoms: A randomized controlled trial. Menopause, 21(4), 330-338. https://doi.org/10.1097/GME.0b013e31829e4089

Efficacy of exercise for menopausal symptoms : A randomized controlled trial. / Sternfeld, Barbara; Guthrie, Katherine A.; Ensrud, Kristine E.; Lacroix, Andrea Z.; Larson, Joseph C.; Dunn, Andrea L.; Anderson, Garnet L.; Seguin, Rebecca A.; Carpenter, Janet; Newton, Katherine M.; Reed, Susan D.; Freeman, Ellen W.; Cohen, Lee S.; Joffe, Hadine; Roberts, Melanie; Caan, Bette J.

In: Menopause, Vol. 21, No. 4, 2014, p. 330-338.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sternfeld, B, Guthrie, KA, Ensrud, KE, Lacroix, AZ, Larson, JC, Dunn, AL, Anderson, GL, Seguin, RA, Carpenter, J, Newton, KM, Reed, SD, Freeman, EW, Cohen, LS, Joffe, H, Roberts, M & Caan, BJ 2014, 'Efficacy of exercise for menopausal symptoms: A randomized controlled trial', Menopause, vol. 21, no. 4, pp. 330-338. https://doi.org/10.1097/GME.0b013e31829e4089
Sternfeld B, Guthrie KA, Ensrud KE, Lacroix AZ, Larson JC, Dunn AL et al. Efficacy of exercise for menopausal symptoms: A randomized controlled trial. Menopause. 2014;21(4):330-338. https://doi.org/10.1097/GME.0b013e31829e4089
Sternfeld, Barbara ; Guthrie, Katherine A. ; Ensrud, Kristine E. ; Lacroix, Andrea Z. ; Larson, Joseph C. ; Dunn, Andrea L. ; Anderson, Garnet L. ; Seguin, Rebecca A. ; Carpenter, Janet ; Newton, Katherine M. ; Reed, Susan D. ; Freeman, Ellen W. ; Cohen, Lee S. ; Joffe, Hadine ; Roberts, Melanie ; Caan, Bette J. / Efficacy of exercise for menopausal symptoms : A randomized controlled trial. In: Menopause. 2014 ; Vol. 21, No. 4. pp. 330-338.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE: This study aims to determine the efficacy of exercise training for alleviating vasomotor and other menopausal symptoms. METHODS: Late perimenopausal and postmenopausal sedentary women with frequent vasomotor symptoms (VMS) participated in a randomized controlled trial conducted in three sites: 106 women randomized to exercise and 142 women randomized to usual activity. The exercise intervention consisted of individual facility-based aerobic exercise training three times per week for 12 weeks. VMS frequency and bother were recorded on daily diaries at baseline and on weeks 6 and 12. Intent-to-treat analyses compared between-group differences in changes in VMS frequency and bother, sleep symptoms (Insomnia Severity Index and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), and mood (Patient Health Questionnaire-8 and Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 questionnaire). RESULTS: At the end of week 12, changes in VMS frequency in the exercise group (mean change,-2.4 VMS/d; 95{\%} CI,-3.0 to-1.7) and VMS bother (mean change on a four-point scale,-0.5; 95{\%} CI,-0.6 to-0.4) were not significantly different from those in the control group (-2.6 VMS/d; 95{\%} CI,-3.2 to-2.0; P = 0.43;-0.5 points; 95{\%} CI,-0.6 to-0.4; P = 0.75). The exercise group reported greater improvement in insomnia symptoms (P = 0.03), subjective sleep quality (P = 0.01), and depressive symptoms (P = 0.04), but differences were small and not statistically significant when P values were adjusted for multiple comparisons. Results were similar when considering treatment-adherent women only. CONCLUSIONS: These findings provide strong evidence that 12 weeks of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise do not alleviate VMS but may result in small improvements in sleep quality, insomnia, and depression in midlife sedentary women.",
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AU - Lacroix, Andrea Z.

AU - Larson, Joseph C.

AU - Dunn, Andrea L.

AU - Anderson, Garnet L.

AU - Seguin, Rebecca A.

AU - Carpenter, Janet

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N2 - OBJECTIVE: This study aims to determine the efficacy of exercise training for alleviating vasomotor and other menopausal symptoms. METHODS: Late perimenopausal and postmenopausal sedentary women with frequent vasomotor symptoms (VMS) participated in a randomized controlled trial conducted in three sites: 106 women randomized to exercise and 142 women randomized to usual activity. The exercise intervention consisted of individual facility-based aerobic exercise training three times per week for 12 weeks. VMS frequency and bother were recorded on daily diaries at baseline and on weeks 6 and 12. Intent-to-treat analyses compared between-group differences in changes in VMS frequency and bother, sleep symptoms (Insomnia Severity Index and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), and mood (Patient Health Questionnaire-8 and Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 questionnaire). RESULTS: At the end of week 12, changes in VMS frequency in the exercise group (mean change,-2.4 VMS/d; 95% CI,-3.0 to-1.7) and VMS bother (mean change on a four-point scale,-0.5; 95% CI,-0.6 to-0.4) were not significantly different from those in the control group (-2.6 VMS/d; 95% CI,-3.2 to-2.0; P = 0.43;-0.5 points; 95% CI,-0.6 to-0.4; P = 0.75). The exercise group reported greater improvement in insomnia symptoms (P = 0.03), subjective sleep quality (P = 0.01), and depressive symptoms (P = 0.04), but differences were small and not statistically significant when P values were adjusted for multiple comparisons. Results were similar when considering treatment-adherent women only. CONCLUSIONS: These findings provide strong evidence that 12 weeks of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise do not alleviate VMS but may result in small improvements in sleep quality, insomnia, and depression in midlife sedentary women.

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