Electrophysiologic effects of intravenous aminophylline in heart transplant recipients with sinus node dysfunction

S. A. Rothman, V. Jeevanandam, C. P. Seeber, I. L. Pina, H. H. Hsia, A. A. Bove, J. M. Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Sinus node dysfunction has been reported to occur in up to 50% of orthotopic heart transplant recipients, and oral theophylline has been used in an attempt to limit the morbidity associated with this abnormality. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the electrophysiologic effects of methylxanthines on sinus node function. Methods: Sinus node testing was performed in 26 patients before and after the infusion of 6 mg/kg of aminophylline. Thirteen of these patients had abnormal sinus node function at baseline, and thirteen had normal sinus node function. Sinus node dysfunction was diagnosed by a rhythm other than sinus in five patients, a prolonged corrected sinus node recovery time in two patients, and the presence of a secondary pause in six patients. Results: In patients with abnormal sinus node function a significant decrease was observed in the sinus node recovery time (-14% ± 5%) and corrected sinus node recovery time (-33% ± 25%) in response to aminophylline; however, neither parameter was normalized. A decrease in the sinus cycle length (-6% ± 8%) was not statistically significant. In patients with normal sinus node function, a significant decrease was seen in both the sinus node recovery time (-9% ± 7%) and sinus cycle length (-9% ± 4%). The corrected sinus node recovery time decreased by 4% ± 28% in patients with normal conditions but was not significant. Overall, aminophylline resolved the underlying sinus node abnormality in only one of thirteen patients with abnormal sinus node function. Conclusions: This study suggests that the use of theophylline in patients with marked sinus node dysfunction may not decrease their risks for subsequent bradycardic events.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)429-435
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Heart and Lung Transplantation
Volume14
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jun 27 1995
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Transplantation

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Electrophysiologic effects of intravenous aminophylline in heart transplant recipients with sinus node dysfunction'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this