Elevated serum levels of IL-1ra in children with Plasmodium falciparum malaria are associated with increased severity of disease

Chandy John, Gregory S. Park, Nadia Sam-Agudu, Robert O. Opoka, Michael J. Boivin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Animal models suggest that cytokines and chemokines play a role in cerebral malaria (CM) pathogenesis, but levels of a number of cytokines and chemokines thought to be important in the pathogenesis of other infectious diseases are not well characterized in children with CM. Serum levels of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) were measured in 77 children with CM, 70 children with uncomplicated malaria (UM) and 63 healthy community children (CC) in Uganda. Children with CM had elevated serum levels of IL-1ra and IL-8 as compared to children with UM (median levels in pg/ml, 11,891 vs. 6510, P = 0.05, and 63 vs. 41, P = 0.01, respectively). Children with CM who died (n = 4) had higher serum levels than survivors of IL-1ra (median levels in pg/ml, 65,757 vs. 10,355, P = 0.02), G-CSF (709 vs. 117, P = 0.02), and MCP-1 (1275 vs. 216, P = 0.03) but not IL-8 (76 vs. 62, P = NS). Elevated IL-1ra levels are associated with increased disease severity in children with malaria, and very elevated levels of IL-1ra, G-CSF and MCP-1 are seen in children who die of CM.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)204-208
Number of pages5
JournalCytokine
Volume41
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Interleukin-1 Receptors
Falciparum Malaria
Cerebral Malaria
Chemokine CCL2
Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor
Interleukin-8
Serum
Chemokines
Malaria
Cytokines
Animals
Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor
Uganda
Communicable Diseases
Survivors
Animal Models

Keywords

  • Cerebral malaria
  • Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor
  • Interleukin-1ra
  • Interleukin-8
  • Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Elevated serum levels of IL-1ra in children with Plasmodium falciparum malaria are associated with increased severity of disease. / John, Chandy; Park, Gregory S.; Sam-Agudu, Nadia; Opoka, Robert O.; Boivin, Michael J.

In: Cytokine, Vol. 41, No. 3, 03.2008, p. 204-208.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

John, Chandy ; Park, Gregory S. ; Sam-Agudu, Nadia ; Opoka, Robert O. ; Boivin, Michael J. / Elevated serum levels of IL-1ra in children with Plasmodium falciparum malaria are associated with increased severity of disease. In: Cytokine. 2008 ; Vol. 41, No. 3. pp. 204-208.
@article{c8863b5aac3e4cdea6d1948a3d505eeb,
title = "Elevated serum levels of IL-1ra in children with Plasmodium falciparum malaria are associated with increased severity of disease",
abstract = "Animal models suggest that cytokines and chemokines play a role in cerebral malaria (CM) pathogenesis, but levels of a number of cytokines and chemokines thought to be important in the pathogenesis of other infectious diseases are not well characterized in children with CM. Serum levels of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) were measured in 77 children with CM, 70 children with uncomplicated malaria (UM) and 63 healthy community children (CC) in Uganda. Children with CM had elevated serum levels of IL-1ra and IL-8 as compared to children with UM (median levels in pg/ml, 11,891 vs. 6510, P = 0.05, and 63 vs. 41, P = 0.01, respectively). Children with CM who died (n = 4) had higher serum levels than survivors of IL-1ra (median levels in pg/ml, 65,757 vs. 10,355, P = 0.02), G-CSF (709 vs. 117, P = 0.02), and MCP-1 (1275 vs. 216, P = 0.03) but not IL-8 (76 vs. 62, P = NS). Elevated IL-1ra levels are associated with increased disease severity in children with malaria, and very elevated levels of IL-1ra, G-CSF and MCP-1 are seen in children who die of CM.",
keywords = "Cerebral malaria, Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, Interleukin-1ra, Interleukin-8, Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1",
author = "Chandy John and Park, {Gregory S.} and Nadia Sam-Agudu and Opoka, {Robert O.} and Boivin, {Michael J.}",
year = "2008",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1016/j.cyto.2007.12.008",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "41",
pages = "204--208",
journal = "Cytokine",
issn = "1043-4666",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Elevated serum levels of IL-1ra in children with Plasmodium falciparum malaria are associated with increased severity of disease

AU - John, Chandy

AU - Park, Gregory S.

AU - Sam-Agudu, Nadia

AU - Opoka, Robert O.

AU - Boivin, Michael J.

PY - 2008/3

Y1 - 2008/3

N2 - Animal models suggest that cytokines and chemokines play a role in cerebral malaria (CM) pathogenesis, but levels of a number of cytokines and chemokines thought to be important in the pathogenesis of other infectious diseases are not well characterized in children with CM. Serum levels of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) were measured in 77 children with CM, 70 children with uncomplicated malaria (UM) and 63 healthy community children (CC) in Uganda. Children with CM had elevated serum levels of IL-1ra and IL-8 as compared to children with UM (median levels in pg/ml, 11,891 vs. 6510, P = 0.05, and 63 vs. 41, P = 0.01, respectively). Children with CM who died (n = 4) had higher serum levels than survivors of IL-1ra (median levels in pg/ml, 65,757 vs. 10,355, P = 0.02), G-CSF (709 vs. 117, P = 0.02), and MCP-1 (1275 vs. 216, P = 0.03) but not IL-8 (76 vs. 62, P = NS). Elevated IL-1ra levels are associated with increased disease severity in children with malaria, and very elevated levels of IL-1ra, G-CSF and MCP-1 are seen in children who die of CM.

AB - Animal models suggest that cytokines and chemokines play a role in cerebral malaria (CM) pathogenesis, but levels of a number of cytokines and chemokines thought to be important in the pathogenesis of other infectious diseases are not well characterized in children with CM. Serum levels of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) were measured in 77 children with CM, 70 children with uncomplicated malaria (UM) and 63 healthy community children (CC) in Uganda. Children with CM had elevated serum levels of IL-1ra and IL-8 as compared to children with UM (median levels in pg/ml, 11,891 vs. 6510, P = 0.05, and 63 vs. 41, P = 0.01, respectively). Children with CM who died (n = 4) had higher serum levels than survivors of IL-1ra (median levels in pg/ml, 65,757 vs. 10,355, P = 0.02), G-CSF (709 vs. 117, P = 0.02), and MCP-1 (1275 vs. 216, P = 0.03) but not IL-8 (76 vs. 62, P = NS). Elevated IL-1ra levels are associated with increased disease severity in children with malaria, and very elevated levels of IL-1ra, G-CSF and MCP-1 are seen in children who die of CM.

KW - Cerebral malaria

KW - Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor

KW - Interleukin-1ra

KW - Interleukin-8

KW - Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=39949083934&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=39949083934&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.cyto.2007.12.008

DO - 10.1016/j.cyto.2007.12.008

M3 - Article

C2 - 18282763

AN - SCOPUS:39949083934

VL - 41

SP - 204

EP - 208

JO - Cytokine

JF - Cytokine

SN - 1043-4666

IS - 3

ER -