Eleven months of home virtual reality telerehabilitation - Lessons learned

Meredith Golomb, Monica Barkat-Masih, Brian Rabin, Moustafa Abdelbaky, Meghan Huber, Grigore Burdea

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Indiana University School of Medicine and the Rutgers Tele-rehabilitation Institute have collaborated for over a year on a clinical pilot study of in-home hand telerehabiltation. Virtual reality videogames were used to train three adolescents with hemiplegic cerebral palsy. Training duration varied between 6 and 11 months. The investigators summarize medical, technological, legal, safety, social, and economic issues that arose during this lengthy study. Solutions to deal with these multitude of issues are proposed. The authors stress the importance of choosing multiple outcome measures to detect clinically meaningful change. The authors believe that in-home telerehabilitation is the future of rehabilitation.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2009 Virtual Rehabilitation International Conference, VR 2009
Pages23-28
Number of pages6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009
Event2009 Virtual Rehabilitation International Conference, VR 2009 - Haifa, Israel
Duration: Jun 29 2009Jul 2 2009

Other

Other2009 Virtual Rehabilitation International Conference, VR 2009
CountryIsrael
CityHaifa
Period6/29/097/2/09

Fingerprint

Patient rehabilitation
Virtual reality
Medicine
Economics

Keywords

  • Child
  • Fiber optics
  • Hand
  • Hemiplegia
  • Hemiplegic cerebral palsy
  • Internet
  • Intraventricular hemorrhage
  • Java 3D
  • Perinatal
  • Rehabilitation
  • Remote monitoring
  • Sensing glove
  • Stroke
  • Telerehabilitation
  • Videogame
  • Virtual reality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Software
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Golomb, M., Barkat-Masih, M., Rabin, B., Abdelbaky, M., Huber, M., & Burdea, G. (2009). Eleven months of home virtual reality telerehabilitation - Lessons learned. In 2009 Virtual Rehabilitation International Conference, VR 2009 (pp. 23-28). [5174200] https://doi.org/10.1109/ICVR.2009.5174200

Eleven months of home virtual reality telerehabilitation - Lessons learned. / Golomb, Meredith; Barkat-Masih, Monica; Rabin, Brian; Abdelbaky, Moustafa; Huber, Meghan; Burdea, Grigore.

2009 Virtual Rehabilitation International Conference, VR 2009. 2009. p. 23-28 5174200.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Golomb, M, Barkat-Masih, M, Rabin, B, Abdelbaky, M, Huber, M & Burdea, G 2009, Eleven months of home virtual reality telerehabilitation - Lessons learned. in 2009 Virtual Rehabilitation International Conference, VR 2009., 5174200, pp. 23-28, 2009 Virtual Rehabilitation International Conference, VR 2009, Haifa, Israel, 6/29/09. https://doi.org/10.1109/ICVR.2009.5174200
Golomb M, Barkat-Masih M, Rabin B, Abdelbaky M, Huber M, Burdea G. Eleven months of home virtual reality telerehabilitation - Lessons learned. In 2009 Virtual Rehabilitation International Conference, VR 2009. 2009. p. 23-28. 5174200 https://doi.org/10.1109/ICVR.2009.5174200
Golomb, Meredith ; Barkat-Masih, Monica ; Rabin, Brian ; Abdelbaky, Moustafa ; Huber, Meghan ; Burdea, Grigore. / Eleven months of home virtual reality telerehabilitation - Lessons learned. 2009 Virtual Rehabilitation International Conference, VR 2009. 2009. pp. 23-28
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