Emerging Adult Women’s Views-of-Self in Intimate Partner Relationships That Are Troubled

Allison McCord Stafford, Claire Draucker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to describe how emerging adult (EA) women describe their views-of-self in troubled relationships. Fourteen EA women (ages 18–25 years) wrote four stories about their troubled relationships during a guided-writing intervention. Qualitative descriptive methods and content analysis were used to identify common views-of-self. Four views-of-self in troubled relationships and contrasting views-of-self emerged: (i) silent self-vocal self, (ii) sacrificing self-prioritized self, (iii) caretaking self-boundary-setting self, and (iv) insecure self-secure self. Mental health nurses and other clinicians can use these views-of-self pairs to guide their discussions with EA young women who are involved in troubled relationships.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalIssues in Mental Health Nursing
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Nurse Clinicians
Young Adult
Mental Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Phychiatric Mental Health

Cite this

Emerging Adult Women’s Views-of-Self in Intimate Partner Relationships That Are Troubled. / McCord Stafford, Allison; Draucker, Claire.

In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{1f31aac1c7e04654aa0dc0ecb5e97eb6,
title = "Emerging Adult Women’s Views-of-Self in Intimate Partner Relationships That Are Troubled",
abstract = "The purpose of this study is to describe how emerging adult (EA) women describe their views-of-self in troubled relationships. Fourteen EA women (ages 18–25 years) wrote four stories about their troubled relationships during a guided-writing intervention. Qualitative descriptive methods and content analysis were used to identify common views-of-self. Four views-of-self in troubled relationships and contrasting views-of-self emerged: (i) silent self-vocal self, (ii) sacrificing self-prioritized self, (iii) caretaking self-boundary-setting self, and (iv) insecure self-secure self. Mental health nurses and other clinicians can use these views-of-self pairs to guide their discussions with EA young women who are involved in troubled relationships.",
author = "{McCord Stafford}, Allison and Claire Draucker",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/01612840.2018.1524529",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Issues in Mental Health Nursing",
issn = "0161-2840",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Emerging Adult Women’s Views-of-Self in Intimate Partner Relationships That Are Troubled

AU - McCord Stafford, Allison

AU - Draucker, Claire

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - The purpose of this study is to describe how emerging adult (EA) women describe their views-of-self in troubled relationships. Fourteen EA women (ages 18–25 years) wrote four stories about their troubled relationships during a guided-writing intervention. Qualitative descriptive methods and content analysis were used to identify common views-of-self. Four views-of-self in troubled relationships and contrasting views-of-self emerged: (i) silent self-vocal self, (ii) sacrificing self-prioritized self, (iii) caretaking self-boundary-setting self, and (iv) insecure self-secure self. Mental health nurses and other clinicians can use these views-of-self pairs to guide their discussions with EA young women who are involved in troubled relationships.

AB - The purpose of this study is to describe how emerging adult (EA) women describe their views-of-self in troubled relationships. Fourteen EA women (ages 18–25 years) wrote four stories about their troubled relationships during a guided-writing intervention. Qualitative descriptive methods and content analysis were used to identify common views-of-self. Four views-of-self in troubled relationships and contrasting views-of-self emerged: (i) silent self-vocal self, (ii) sacrificing self-prioritized self, (iii) caretaking self-boundary-setting self, and (iv) insecure self-secure self. Mental health nurses and other clinicians can use these views-of-self pairs to guide their discussions with EA young women who are involved in troubled relationships.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85060007808&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85060007808&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/01612840.2018.1524529

DO - 10.1080/01612840.2018.1524529

M3 - Article

C2 - 30640564

AN - SCOPUS:85060007808

JO - Issues in Mental Health Nursing

JF - Issues in Mental Health Nursing

SN - 0161-2840

ER -