Emerging antimicrobial-resistant infections

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The emergence of antimicrobial-resistant bacterial infections has changed the recommendations for the empirical therapy of community- and hospital-acquired meningitis. In the United States, approximately 34% of pneumococcal isolates are penicillin nonsusceptible, and approximately 14% are resistant to ceftriaxone.1 More than 50% of nosocomial infections in patients in the intensive care unit are due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.2,3 The first documented case of vancomycin-resistant S aureus was reported in the United States in 2002. 4.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1512-1514
Number of pages3
JournalArchives of Neurology
Volume61
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2004

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Methicillin Resistance
Community Hospital
Vancomycin
Cross Infection
Infection
Staphylococcus
Meningitis
Bacterial Infections
Penicillins
Intensive Care Units
Therapeutics
Intensive Care
Penicillin
Therapy
Staphylococcus Aureus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Emerging antimicrobial-resistant infections. / Roos, Karen.

In: Archives of Neurology, Vol. 61, No. 10, 10.2004, p. 1512-1514.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Roos, Karen. / Emerging antimicrobial-resistant infections. In: Archives of Neurology. 2004 ; Vol. 61, No. 10. pp. 1512-1514.
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