Endocrine tumors of the pancreas

Michael House, Richard D. Schulick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose of review: Neoplasms of the endocrine pancreas, commonly referenced as pancreatic islet cell tumors, are rare, often well differentiated endocrine neoplasms, whose biology remains poorly characterized. This article reviews the current clinical management of pancreatic islet cell tumors and describes the molecular events that have been studied to guide future therapies of these peculiar neoplasms. Recent findings: While some islet cell tumors arise in association with the MEN-1 syndrome, the majority of these neoplasms are sporadic lesions whose underlying genetic and molecular events remain largely unknown. Recent work has identified changes in gene expression occurring in metastatic and non-metastatic islet cell tumors, which appear to correlate with the occurrence of lymph node and liver metastases. Epigenetic alterations of select tumor suppressor genes may influence patient survival, and the presence of gene promoter methylation may be used as a prognostic marker system. In addition, multiple molecular alterations, including changes in expression of cellular proteins with migratory, cell cycle or angiogenic functions, have been demonstrated to influence islet cell tumor growth, invasion and metastatic spread. Summary: Understanding the molecular events underlying the biology of pancreatic islet cell tumors will aid the development of accurate prognostic markers and will guide improved therapeutic modalities in the future.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)23-29
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Opinion in Oncology
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Islet Cell Adenoma
Islets of Langerhans
Neoplasms
Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1
Tumor Suppressor Genes
Epigenomics
Methylation
Molecular Biology
Cell Cycle
Lymph Nodes
Neoplasm Metastasis
Gene Expression
Survival
Liver
Therapeutics
Growth
Genes
Pancreatic islet cell tumors
Proteins

Keywords

  • Islet cell tumors
  • MEN-1
  • Pancreas
  • Therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Endocrine tumors of the pancreas. / House, Michael; Schulick, Richard D.

In: Current Opinion in Oncology, Vol. 18, No. 1, 01.2006, p. 23-29.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

House, Michael ; Schulick, Richard D. / Endocrine tumors of the pancreas. In: Current Opinion in Oncology. 2006 ; Vol. 18, No. 1. pp. 23-29.
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